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Author Topic: AFB - Preventing better than cure (burning!)  (Read 204 times)
davidawbrown
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« on: July 09, 2014, 06:39:26 PM »

So there has been a general outbreak of american foulbrood (AFB) in the county- Small county but no risk of it travelling and its made me do some research about AFB.

So AFB exists in two forms, spore and bacterium. Once the spores is ingested by the bee they develop into the bacterium,
but to the root of the question......

The spores are "extremely resistant to desiccation and can remain viable for more than 40 years" - Thanks Wiki-

WAX-

I was talking with a repesentive from Thorns Bee Suppliers (biggest suppliers over here) about wax treatment. I asked her if they treated the wax for disease.
She replied with no. The wax is filtered and that's all. Its too expensive to treat the wax.

So I plan on doing it myself (down the road), my question is relating to the wax.
Paenibacillus spores are heat resistant, I downloaded a document called "2.02.02_AMERICAN_FOULBROOD.pfd

In it, it talks about treating wax "120C (248 F) for 30 minutes at 1 bar"
1 bar is 1 atmosphere, so no compression required.
however if beeswax is heated above 85 C (185 F) discoloration occurs.

This is where im left wondering............

Any ideas......

I'm also aware that this is quite a detailed question.

Thanks again

Regards
Dave
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jayj200
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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2014, 09:29:36 PM »

Just asking the question

What about under vacuum? boils off water 
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davidawbrown
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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2014, 10:15:36 PM »

1 bar is normal atmosphere.

The flash point of beeswax is 204.4 C (400 F)

So you could just put the wax into a Deep Fat Fryer at 120C (248 F)  and go back 30 min later. (except that beeswax is heated above 85 C (185 F) discoloration occurs)
The last thing you want in the mix is water.

If I remember my physics correctly, when your reduce atmospheric pressure (vacuum) that lowers boiling point. That might lower that point at which the wax will turn bad.
 
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Vance G
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2014, 12:52:25 AM »

For what purpose are you wanting to disinfect the wax?  If it is for candles or even lip balm it is out of the hives and not going to infect colonies.  If you are using it for the bees themselves, they won't care if it was discolored when disinfecting it.  I wouldn't personally trust any disinfecting anyway.  I scorch boxes, bottoms and lids thoroughly and doubt they are a concern but frames and combs are no longer on the bees. 

What are your bee inspectors telling you to do to prevent picking up the outbreak?  After supers are pulled and put away I would consider a course of treatment with tylan or tylox.  For Goodness sake do not set your wet supers out to get robbed out!  Fastest way to bring diseased bees into your apiary and to spread any infection you may have.   It is tough.  I burned two more hives this spring and two last fall and thirty the year before.  I have inspected for disease everytime I pull a lid and have seen no indicators but I did treat with tylan early in the spring.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2014, 09:21:16 AM »

The wax encapsulates the spores so they are not really viable.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
davidawbrown
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« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2014, 07:56:59 PM »

For what purpose are you wanting to disinfect the wax?  If it is for candles or even lip balm it is out of the hives and not going to infect colonies.  If you are using it for the bees themselves, they won't care if it was discolored when disinfecting it.  I wouldn't personally trust any disinfecting anyway.  I scorch boxes, bottoms and lids thoroughly and doubt they are a concern but frames and combs are no longer on the bees. 

What are your bee inspectors telling you to do to prevent picking up the outbreak?  After supers are pulled and put away I would consider a course of treatment with tylan or tylox.  For Goodness sake do not set your wet supers out to get robbed out!  Fastest way to bring diseased bees into your apiary and to spread any infection you may have.   It is tough.  I burned two more hives this spring and two last fall and thirty the year before.  I have inspected for disease everytime I pull a lid and have seen no indicators but I did treat with tylan early in the spring.

The wax would be repressed into new sheets of foundation!
I would have been under the impression that the wax was ruined by the treatment process and the bees wouldn't go near it! (my own thoughts)

Of course, I'm not going to do open feeding or another stupid way of getting any disease.
I don't feel at imminent risk of getting AFB, I want to recycle wax and want to clean it of any possible spores!
 

The Bee Association has a "lock down" on bees in and out of west Cavan.
(well asked all members not the transport bees in or out)

and its rural enough so they shouldn't spread naturally anyway.
(Thanks varroa destructor for killing the wild bee population!)
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davidawbrown
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« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2014, 07:58:53 PM »

The wax encapsulates the spores so they are not really viable.

Unless I repress it into wax foundation and the bees work the wax and ingest spores!!

I should have explained my intent with the wax.

And thanks to all for your reply's and input.

Regards
Dave
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