Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 01, 2014, 07:54:34 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: varroa control choices?  (Read 432 times)
rookie2531
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 136

Location: Eastern Kentucky


« on: August 15, 2014, 07:12:19 AM »

I read about api-life, guard, hopguard and a few others and then I see OA fumigation. Why do you think there hasn't been a dominate choice? I would think if they all work about the same, wouldn't the cheaper prevail? Or is there a dominant choice? I guess Im no different than many others, thinking they wouldn't have to worry about mites there first year, but here I am, and I am leaning towards AO, just because it seems cheaper. Any thoughts?
Logged
danno
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2240


Location: Ludington, Michigan


« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2014, 08:11:08 AM »

first off using the same treatment year after year will cause resistance.  Second they all have drawbacks.  OA is not legal in the states.   Formic acid is hard on queens/bee's and is very temp sensitive.   Hopguard  just stinks.  Thymol requires extra trips for second application.   Some are just to expensive
Logged
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15107


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2014, 09:22:07 AM »

i like apiguard (thymol).  it has it's drawbacks.  it's temp dependent and the treatment takes a brood cycle, but i have never noticed any adverse effects in the hive and it does the trick on the mites.

i don't treat every year, so i have not had a resistance issue.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Jim 134
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2231


Location: Hinsdale, New Hampshire 03451 USA


WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2014, 08:00:57 PM »

Maybe something we may like to from read form Michael Bush
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesvarroatreatments.htm


            BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
« Last Edit: August 18, 2014, 02:48:20 AM by Jim 134 » Logged

"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
        Chinese Proverb

"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
 John F. Kennedy
Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/
sawdstmakr
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2916


Location: Jacksonville FL


« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2014, 08:42:07 AM »

Even showing that chart, Michael has not treated his hives since I think it 2008 or before.
Jim
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13626


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2014, 01:43:49 PM »

Last time I treated any of them was 2003.  Last time I treated some of them was 2001.  But if you want to treat, keep in mind the effectiveness with and without brood...
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
rookie2531
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 136

Location: Eastern Kentucky


« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2014, 04:00:49 PM »

It is interesting to hear that some do not treat. I was under the impression that since the mite invasion, everyone had to. The chart is also interesting. I guess I should have done some treatments during the split/rearing. The queens are laying now, learning as I go smiley
Logged
Jim 134
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2231


Location: Hinsdale, New Hampshire 03451 USA


WWW
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2014, 02:58:05 AM »

 Kirk Webster.....
   Is one of the largest treatment-free bee keepers I know in New England you may enjoy some of these articles.


http://www.kirkwebster.com/index.php/collapse-and-recovery-the-gateway-to-treatment-free-beekeeping

Kirk.....
    Does Not Have Email.  If You Want To Communicate With Him, You Will Have To Call Or Send Snail Mail!




              BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
« Last Edit: August 18, 2014, 03:43:45 AM by Jim 134 » Logged

"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
        Chinese Proverb

"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
 John F. Kennedy
Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.297 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page August 30, 2014, 08:53:14 AM
anything