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Author Topic: So they'll be there come spring.  (Read 560 times)
ColdToes
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« on: September 21, 2013, 11:56:36 PM »

Why did you cut that tree down? The wife asks. Well it shades the hives all winter, and when everything else is thawed out there is still snow here; I reply. Gets me thinking of all the work we put into seeing our ladies will be there come spring. What labor intensive thing have you done this fall? So they'll be there come spring
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T Beek
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« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2013, 06:40:26 AM »

Got rid of the cement blocks used for hive stands, replaced with cedar 4x4's on bottoms creating a 'dead air' space below all hives for winter.

Fed during dearths (NOW) and removed all empty frames and/or supers.  Will be insulating backs and 2 sides w/in next few weeks with 1" rigid foam.

Coldtoes;  the tree your describing must be Pine or Spruce if its holding leaves all winter and shading your hives.... OR ........... huh
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PeeVee
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« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2013, 07:37:12 AM »

Will be insulating two sides with rigid foam as yard gets sun from sun up to sun down on the other two sides. Last year I put up wooden snow fence on the southern side of the yard for a wind break - the Northern side has a row of Hemlock.

TBeek - I like the Idea of wood under the hives in place of concrete blocks. Also more insulation factor from frost transfer ground to hive.
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-Paul VanSlyke - Cheers from Deposit,NY
Glen H
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« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2013, 08:36:56 PM »


TBeek - I like the Idea of wood under the hives in place of concrete blocks. Also more insulation factor from frost transfer ground to hive.



I did a similar thing for my stands to create a dead air space. Used PT 2 x 12






Glen
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buzzbee
Ken
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« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2013, 08:41:26 PM »

When working on the farm we set water stations up in the field. We dug about a 6 foot deep hole below the stations and it left enough warm air up to keep the water thawed most of the time. Wonder about setting a hive over a hole like that?
If your one that uses top entrances,you could set your bottom right above said hole.
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Glen H
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« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2013, 08:46:16 PM »

When working on the farm we set water stations up in the field. We dug about a 6 foot deep hole below the stations and it left enough warm air up to keep the water thawed most of the time. Wonder about setting a hive over a hole like that?
We do the same thing at work for the horse's water bowls in the field, 6-7 foot deep hole with a 12" wide pipe in it, to draw warm air out of the ground in the winter keeps the under ground pipes from freezing as they come up out of the ground into the bowls . I too was thinking of it for hives but came to the conclusion I'm too lazy to dig a hole that deep.

Glen
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