Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 31, 2014, 02:16:51 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Wild/Natural/Small cell comb..  (Read 583 times)
TenshiB
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 86


Location: Georgia

Your happiness is up to you.


« on: September 15, 2013, 09:55:22 AM »

With this type of comb (wild/natural/small cell):

Can a commercially-bought (or domestic?) queen back her abdomen in these smaller cells to lay eggs successfully? If so, I have yet to attest that she can.

Will the remaining "wild" bees from the cutout store nectar in their old comb that has been rubberbanded into frames? They have only seemed to store a little nectar (or sugar water) in just two of seven frames that have their old comb from the log that we got 'em from..

The $30 queen may be doomed as their numbers are dwindling fast, she doesn't seem to be laying eggs, and fall then winter is on its way. Luckily we're in the piedmont/fall line area of GA..

I don't see much salvation for these bees other than a hope and a prayer that they can turn things around on their lonesome.. They have two to three drawn-out mediums that had SOME eggs in them from a booming hive we robbed two weeks ago.. We checked yesterday and those particular cells are capped for the most part. I did notice one worker bee dragging a pupa out of the front entrance. Also saw one cell with the cap half-way there and an exposed (white) pupa with eyes already turning black--I don't perceive that to be a good sign.

Maybe when/if these robbed babies hatch, they'll coax this queen into a laying mode? If this is the case, it needs to hurry!

About the queen: she has had free-range for 7 days; she was taken from a five frame nuc in which she had quite pretty brood pattern going on; and we've got two others from the same man in the same fashion (at different times of the year, though) and these other two queens are phenomenal. [=
Logged

The bees that do no work do not survive long. The people that do no work get rewarded.
rwlaw
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 166

Location: Grand Rapids Michigan


« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2013, 10:34:13 AM »

Wow, you got some heavy stuff going on! One question, are you feeding? Because if your not the answer for the lack of nectar is because they have to feed the brood that you gave them.
The queen might not laying because ( and I'm guessing) of the lack of food also, maybe give them a frame of pollen & nectar.
Also & I don't want to offend, but when you tied the comb into the frames did you get the orientation right? If they're upside down she won't lay in em either.
The small cell guys'll have to chime in about if a large cell queen can lay in small cell comb, seems like she could.
Logged

Can't ever say that bk'n ain't a learning experience!
10framer
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1504

Location: Butler,GA


« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2013, 06:41:22 PM »

i think i've seen this asked before and it seems like the answer was yes. 
Logged
TenshiB
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 86


Location: Georgia

Your happiness is up to you.


« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2013, 10:08:09 PM »

Hmm.. thanks for the responses!

I'm positive that I paid no mind to orientation of the comb, so that is probably a major reason they don't care for it too much. I think that this hive in particular is not going to make it. Leaves me wondering if we could do anything with the queen.    /=
Logged

The bees that do no work do not survive long. The people that do no work get rewarded.
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15101


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2013, 11:02:04 PM »

Quote
Also & I don't want to offend, but when you tied the comb into the frames did you get the orientation right? If they're upside down she won't lay in em either.


my first thought.

Quote
I'm positive that I paid no mind to orientation of the comb, so that is probably a major reason they don't care for it too much. I think that this hive in particular is not going to make it. Leaves me wondering if we could do anything with the queen.
    /=

shake them off into a nuc with drawn comb and feed.

Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2013, 07:09:01 AM »

Bees will adapt "if" there are enough of them and time permits.  Queens egg laying slows way down this time of year, even in GA.

Extremely important to get the right placement of comb.   If it was July they'd have time to correct any mistakes made by beekeepers (upside down comb placement?)....In September....not so much.
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13626


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2013, 09:29:22 AM »

>Can a commercially-bought (or domestic?) queen back her abdomen in these smaller cells to lay eggs successfully?

Yes.

> If so, I have yet to attest that she can.

There may be other extenuating circumstances...

>Will the remaining "wild" bees from the cutout store nectar in their old comb that has been rubberbanded into frames?

Usually, yes.

>They have only seemed to store a little nectar (or sugar water) in just two of seven frames that have their old comb from the log that we got 'em from..

They typically don't like combs that are sloped the wrong way (as already mentioned above), but I have seen them fill them with honey sometimes and, if there is no where else to lay, I've seen the queen lay in them sometimes.  But all in all they don't seem to like them as much.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
TenshiB
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 86


Location: Georgia

Your happiness is up to you.


« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2013, 10:28:12 PM »

Thanks all. These sorts of lessons are pretty expensive--lessons from experience, that is--but they're pretty effective because I won't be forgetting them.
In my hurry I paid no attention to the orientation of the combs rubberbanded into the frames.. This "hive" (not sure it can even be considered one) is most likely doomed and I'm thinking that we ought to just take our lumps on this one. We'll continue to feed them. When we did the cut-out we should have looked a lot harder for that wild queen because, as I understand it, sometimes the wild queens have striped abdomens that blend in pretty well with the working class (I remember seeing Mr. Bush and someone else discussing this).. Anywho the loss is:  $30 queen
                             6 hours of a rainy weekend day

Again, I think the value of the knowledge gained kind of balances things..

Right now this bunch is just in a single medium hive body with some of the frames with the natural comb that the workers have actually stored some nectar and pollen in; some frames that are not yet drawn; and then there are some medium frames that we robbed from a prolific hive/queen that were fresh drawn (partial) with eggs in them. When we checked those frames, the cells that had eggs were capped and I'm thinking they should be hatching around 09-21 since we put them there about two weekends ago.. MAYBE the young brood (in the hundreds at best, sadly) will stimulate the queen to get crackin'? OH, they're also being fed sugar water.. I'm pretty sure it's 1:1 with a tsp of Pro-Health.
Logged

The bees that do no work do not survive long. The people that do no work get rewarded.
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2013, 05:17:27 AM »

Nothing like 'hands on' lessons.  They seem to adhere a bit more and I've got the lumps to prove it  Smiley

That little colony may yet surprise you, you've got a 'little' time remaining.  You may want to change your syrup ratio to 2-1 though as with less water in the syrup there is also less water for bees to evaporate.
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
rwlaw
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 166

Location: Grand Rapids Michigan


« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2013, 06:58:03 AM »

An old millwright I used to work with had a favorite phrase, " not makimg mistakes means your not working".
That was his way of saying, ya gotta learn sometime lol.
Next chance you get, hold the suspect frames at eyeball level,if you see comb at the top the tilt is upward. Put all the good frames in the middle and let em go.
 IMO give em 2/1 syrup and don't put in any HBH, that stuff has it's place,but not in a situation as yours.
Logged

Can't ever say that bk'n ain't a learning experience!
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13626


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2013, 09:28:42 AM »

I had a boss who was fond of saying something like that.  He said "If you're not making mistakes you're not doing anything."  Then if he didn't think you were working hard enough he might say "I don't see you making many mistakes today..."

http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslearning.htm
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Santa Caras
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 93

Location: Lakeland, FL


« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2013, 10:18:58 AM »

Yeap...had an old oilman/cattle rancher in Texas that used to say the same thing about not making mistakes your not working.
Thing is....his mistakes and accumullated several to many millions of dollars in his bank too!!!!
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.237 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page July 26, 2014, 05:32:31 PM