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Author Topic: help winter prep  (Read 562 times)
sied172
New Bee
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Posts: 6

Location: Northern Ohio


« on: September 11, 2013, 07:16:30 PM »

Hi new bee keeper from northern Ohio.  Its 9/11 and I need to medicate for AFB before winter. I have a very Strong packed hive consisting of two deeps and two medium supers. The temp is 96 today but its suppose to drop into the mid 60s next week.  Both of my supers are 3/4 full of uncapped honey and I know I can't treat for AFB with them on. Should I skip the treatment and leave the two medium super on through winter. My hive is overly packed and I don't think all the bees will fit if I remove the supers, plus there almost full but no caps. The state inspector told me to leave the supers on for the winter due to my very large population but then i  cant medicate. I'm a new keeper so i don't have another hive or any drawn comb to start a new hive. This late in the season i may get some more warm weather or it could start to change soon. I have no idea what to do.  If i remove the super will the cram themselves in the bottom and tough it out, or should i leave the supers on and remove them in the spring for medication. There has been some FB in the area but mine inspected fine.Thank
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Oblio13
House Bee
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Posts: 215

Location: Central New Hampshire


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« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2013, 07:51:38 PM »

Why do you want to medicate your bees for AFB if they don't have it?
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sied172
New Bee
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Posts: 6

Location: Northern Ohio


« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2013, 08:10:40 PM »

I'm self taught no help, I assumed from my
 reading that it was standard practice to treat spring and fall. I was told that once you have it there is nothing you can do. I will take any advice i'm given
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sawdstmakr
Super Bee
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Gender: Male
Posts: 2658


Location: Jacksonville FL


« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2013, 09:40:14 PM »

Where did you get the bees from? We're they a package or a nuc? If they were a nuc, did the previous beek treat for AFB? If not you probably do not need to treat for AFB. Most large commercial beeks have been treating their bees for AFB. It does not kill the AFB so the the spores and most of their hives are infected but they keep it suppressed. If you get one of their hives and do not treat, in about 2 years it can show up.
Check with the seller.
Jim
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sawdstmakr
Super Bee
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Gender: Male
Posts: 2658


Location: Jacksonville FL


« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2013, 09:49:49 PM »

By the way, here in north FL, most beeks do not treat for AFB and it is very rare. A friend of mines daughter had hives that she bought from a large commercial beek and at the 2 year mark, the state had to burn all 7 hives. Only case of AFB that I know of.
Jim
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