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Author Topic: fall prep  (Read 311 times)
sied172
New Bee
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Posts: 6

Location: Northern Ohio


« on: September 11, 2013, 07:12:33 PM »

Hi new bee keeper from northern Ohio.  Its 9/11 and I need to medicate for AFB before winter. I have a very Strong packed hive consisting of two deeps and two medium supers. The temp is 96 today but its suppose to drop into the mid 60s next week.  Both of my supers are 3/4 full of uncapped honey and I know I can't treat for AFB with them on. Should I skip the treatment and leave the two medium super on through winter. My hive is overly packed and I don't think all the bees will fit if I remove the supers, plus there almost full but no caps. The state inspector told me to leave the supers on for the winter due to my very large population but then i  cant medicate. I'm a new keeper so i don't have another hive or any drawn comb to start a new hive. This late in the season i may get some more warm weather or it could start to change soon. I have no idea what to do.  If i remove the super will the cram themselves in the bottom and tough it out, or should i leave the supers on and remove them in the spring for medication. There has been some FB in the area but mine inspected fine.Thank
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T Beek
Super Bee
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Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2013, 05:05:41 AM »

No reason to treat for something they don't have.  And if they do have AFB you've got more problems than treating can help.

There are pros and cons to most things in beekeeping, including treating. 

Personally I DO NOT TREAT with anything other than sugar syrup and ONLY if bees are starving.  This site can assist you in determining which direction you and your bees will go.  Treat (which is often no treat at all) or no-treat. 

Read as much as you can before jumping ahead and dumping something into your hive that you and your bees may regret.

As for your supers, I'd leave everything until your first killing frost.  Then give your hive a heft to determine weight.  Removing the one super for later feeding or leaving it is a decision to be made once foraging has ended IMO.

Welcome to this wonderful world of beekeeping.
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Michael Bush
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Location: Nehawka, NE


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« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2013, 10:24:47 AM »

Keep in mind that in most of the world it is against the law to treat for AFB either for prevention or cure.  It is considered by most of the experts world wide to only hide the presence of AFB and actually makes the bees more susceptible to the disease.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0033188

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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
sied172
New Bee
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Posts: 6

Location: Northern Ohio


« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2013, 09:06:14 PM »

Thanks for the help appreciate it

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