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Author Topic: Fall Treatment for Varro Mites  (Read 2805 times)

Offline RHBee

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Re: Fall Treatment for Varro Mites
« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2013, 11:29:26 PM »
>The trouble is finding them.

They are all around you...


Michael, do you mean feral colonies or allowing our bees to return to their natural size of 4.6 to 4.9mm?
Later,
Ray

Offline Better.to.Bee.than.not

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Re: Fall Treatment for Varro Mites
« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2013, 04:47:09 PM »

He means, resistant stock...ie if there were not, all bees would already be dead.... and since they have survived literally tens of millions of years on their own without people interfering, they are all around out there.... least thats my guess what he means.

Offline T Beek

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Re: Fall Treatment for Varro Mites
« Reply #22 on: September 15, 2013, 06:13:30 AM »

He means, resistant stock...ie if there were not, all bees would already be dead.... and since they have survived literally tens of millions of years on their own without people interfering, they are all around out there.... least thats my guess what he means.

Right On!   X:X X:X  I feel confident saying that honeybees were doing very well until humans began messing with them AND their world.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2013, 06:49:56 AM by T Beek »
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Offline RHBee

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Re: Re: Fall Treatment for Varro Mites
« Reply #23 on: September 15, 2013, 07:54:17 AM »
T Beek, I couldn't agree more. I just wanted some clarification on what Michael ment. Varroa and SHB were both introduced to EHB by man. Many of the stresses on bees are caused by the beekeeper. I'm sure that bees in their natural environment don't have their hives torn open once a week either. Even their size has been manipulated. They are considered livestock and are treated as such.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2013, 12:25:27 PM by RHBee »
Later,
Ray

Online Michael Bush

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Re: Fall Treatment for Varro Mites
« Reply #24 on: September 16, 2013, 10:39:37 AM »
>>>The trouble is finding them.
>>They are all around you...
>Michael, do you mean feral colonies or allowing our bees to return to their natural size of 4.6 to 4.9mm?

I meant feral bees are all around us.  Bees that can survive without treatments are not hard to find.  But I don't have any luck with Varroa while putting them on large cell comb, so yes, natural size helps, but that was not the topic.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline RHBee

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Re: Re: Fall Treatment for Varro Mites
« Reply #25 on: September 16, 2013, 12:21:32 PM »
Thanks Michael,
I know of just the candidate. Established supposedly 5yrs in a stump.
How about the HBH 4X drench for varroa in the mean time?
Later,
Ray

Offline D Coates

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Re: Fall Treatment for Varro Mites
« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2013, 12:43:04 PM »
Right On!   X:X X:X  I feel confident saying that honeybees were doing very well until humans began messing with them AND their world.

With that thought pattern we humans owe it to the bees to eradicate them back to their original world.  They're not native in the America's and haven't we messed with both of our worlds by introducing them here?  We need to go back to keeping them in skeps, wait... that's messing with them too.  Uh..., if we actually followed this all the way we'd have to stop keeping bees.
Ninja, is not in the dictionary.  Well played Ninja's, well played...

Offline chux

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Re: Fall Treatment for Varro Mites
« Reply #27 on: September 16, 2013, 12:55:54 PM »
I saw FBM post a vid where he fogged the hive with mineral oil. Said that was a great, "natural" treatment. I'm thinking about buying a fogger and giving it a try as my only form of treatment. Anybody got thoughts on this?

Soap box moment:
(I believe God created the Earth for us to enjoy. We have been given stewardship of bees right along with everything else. It's not "their world." We should enjoy the honey they produce, and we should do our best to take care of the bees. Two sides of the coin. Both are worthy and should be respected. I tend to think that less treatment will be better for the health of the bees in the long run, but if some treatment is needed for us to be able to have honey, then so be it. The great thing is, if we have several different approaches, more than likely someone is going to be successful. Over time that success will become evident and more people will go in that direction.)

Mineral oil fogger thoughts????

Online Michael Bush

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Re: Fall Treatment for Varro Mites
« Reply #28 on: September 16, 2013, 04:38:41 PM »
>How about the HBH 4X drench for varroa in the mean time?

Two essential oils both of which will kill the microbes, interfere with smells in the hive and one of which will actually mimic one of the pheromones of the hive.  I wouldn't.

>Mineral oil fogger thoughts?

I used one for a year and measure the results at the end of the year.  In my experience FGMO was useful if you use it every week all through the brood rearing season.  It did not have enough knockdown to only use it when you need it.  If you let the fog back up to the flames on the fogger it will blow the top off of the hive and singe a lot of bees...
 
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen