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Author Topic: Help with re-queening.  (Read 481 times)
trottet1
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Location: lake hopatcong nj


« on: September 08, 2013, 04:13:58 PM »

I just re-queened today.   I got a new queen and a push in cage.  The single body hive has been queenless  for about 19 hours and I had removed all queen cells (4 of them)  I found a great place on a frame with plenty of open cells for her to start laying in and nectar.  one of the original workers ended up in there with her (I tried my best to keep them all out)  the one thing I forgot to be mindful of was to make sure there was emerging brood where I placed her.  I am almost certain there is not because I put her on the second frame in.  my questions are 1) is this very detrimental to the requeen process.  and 2) what would be worse, leaving it as is or disturbing the hive tomorrow (3rd day in a row) to correct my error? thank you for your time reading my post.

todd
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GSF
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Location: Central AL (nw corner of Elmore County)


« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2013, 06:49:41 PM »

Greetings Todd & Welcome to the board. I am a new beek and am only reciting what I have read. Others with more experience will stir you in the right directions if I err.

Put your location on your profile if you desire because some of the future questions you may ask could be location specific. First question, have you released your queen already? How long was she in there? Not meaning to insult you but if you have stuck her in there already the others may kill her. I'm not sure how often I went in my hive. I put the (mated) queen in and checked it 3 days later to see that she was out. Then I waited another week or two so I could visually see if there was brood. I did and that answered a lot of questions in itself.

I got a three pound package on Jun 7th. I put them in a deep super with plastic foundation. They didn't mind it at all. I have read where others have messed too much with a new package and they checked out.
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"Life is hard, It's even harder when you're stupid."

John Wayne
trottet1
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« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2013, 06:57:19 PM »

I didn't release her.  She is a mated  queen and I am using a push in cage to introduce her.  She is isolated from the colony.
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rwlaw
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« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2013, 08:39:45 PM »

Sounds like you did alright, IMHO even if you had some brood hatch, they're not come out of the cells will jaws snapping. They're going to align with the the queen and should beg food thru the screen just like the queen.
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Can't ever say that bk'n ain't a learning experience!
tefer2
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« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2013, 06:46:41 PM »

I'd say, leave them alone this time and observe. When we use a push in cage they are 1/2 a medium frame size. That gives us a better chance of placing over capped brood, nectar, and empty cells. The darker the capped brood the faster they will emerge into the cage for you. We also try to place the cage in the middle where all the bees are.
I like this method for high dollar breeder queens. th_thumbsupup
« Last Edit: September 10, 2013, 07:09:48 PM by tefer2 » Logged
trottet1
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« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2013, 07:00:40 PM »

Tefer2, thank you.  That is really good advice and makes a lot of sense.  I appreciate your knowledge.
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tefer2
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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2013, 07:09:17 PM »

Another tip, push in cage release does not work very well with a laying worker hive.
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trottet1
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« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2013, 07:21:53 PM »

I am pretty sure I don't have a laying worker.  I had someone come from the beekeepers association to look before hand.  We removed all queen cells and looked for multiple eggs in cells.  I was never queenless.  I had a poor laying queen.  She was removed the day prior to installing the push in cage.  I only wish I had the beekeepers association person the day I installed the push in.  I'm sure it would have been done much better.  thanks again for more sound advice.  It really helps us new guys out a bunch. 
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tefer2
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« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2013, 07:34:24 PM »

Your welcome, least this way you won't have to learn this stuff the way I did.
Making a mistake on a regular production queen doesn't end up costing hundreds of dollars like a breeder queen. Don't be shy, we are here to help out! Jerry
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