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Author Topic: Feral Bees in trouble due to Small Hive Beetles in this region.  (Read 451 times)
capt44
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« on: September 08, 2013, 10:56:54 AM »

I have done quite a few trap-outs and a couple of cut outs on Bees in Trees this year.
I have noticed the nest were infested with Small Hive Beetles and their Larva.
Last fall I was watching 5 bee trees going into winter, this spring I went to check on them and 4 out of the 5 was dead.
I watched 2 bee trees this season die.
Of the trap-outs I've did Hive Beetle Larva was very high.
Here is a picture of a tree when I took the trap-out down, notice the larva outside the tree.
When I took the plywood down the beetle larva was on the outside of the tree where the plywood was.



At another trap-out site I seen a mature hive beetle crawl out of the funnel, fly off and make a couple of circles and landed on the hive going straight for the entrance which was covered with bees.
The entrance was a 1 1/4 inch hole, the small hive beetle showed to be very aggressive showing no fear of the bees.
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Richard Vardaman (capt44)
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« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2013, 11:43:21 AM »

Capt44,
They have nothing to fear from the honeybee. Their shell is impervious to the stings. All our bees can do is chase them.
As far as feral bees go I've been watching a local colony with dismay I now see honey dripping out of their entrance. The uninformed think that is an indication of abundance but I know better. Sad.
Ray
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Later,
Ray
OldMech
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« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2013, 01:29:50 PM »

hmmm.. not good..  I know of several feral colonies. I have yet to notice any problems with them, and am hoping they make the winter so I can (with luck) collect swarms..  I would never trap them out, they are not bothering anyone where they are, so it is my goal to use them for swarm collection...   I have feeders I plan to set up near each of the ferla hives in hopes of giving them a bit of support.
    Is there anything you can do to assist a feral hive with shb as Cap mentioned?
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39 Hives and growing.  Havent found the end of the comfort zone yet.
bud1
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« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2013, 05:10:28 PM »

best thing to do is leave them alone once it gets hot, end of june on    I dont mess with them as I lose them every time
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RHBee
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« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2013, 05:25:16 PM »

hmmm.. not good..  I know of several feral colonies. I have yet to notice any problems with them, and am hoping they make the winter so I can (with luck) collect swarms..  I would never trap them out, they are not bothering anyone where they are, so it is my goal to use them for swarm collection...   I have feeders I plan to set up near each of the ferla hives in hopes of giving them a bit of support.
    Is there anything you can do to assist a feral hive with shb as Cap mentioned?

I hope you don't have the population of SHB in Iowa that we enjoy down here. I would open feed near a feral hive in spring and put out swarm traps. I have a colony in an Oak right beside my house. I'm either gonna trap them in ihe spring or feed and trap. I almost hate to trap them now because of what capt44's talking about.
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Ray
OldMech
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« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2013, 06:04:13 PM »

hmmm.. not good..  I know of several feral colonies. I have yet to notice any problems with them, and am hoping they make the winter so I can (with luck) collect swarms..  I would never trap them out, they are not bothering anyone where they are, so it is my goal to use them for swarm collection...   I have feeders I plan to set up near each of the ferla hives in hopes of giving them a bit of support.
    Is there anything you can do to assist a feral hive with shb as Cap mentioned?

I hope you don't have the population of SHB in Iowa that we enjoy down here. I would open feed near a feral hive in spring and put out swarm traps. I have a colony in an Oak right beside my house. I'm either gonna trap them in ihe spring or feed and trap. I almost hate to trap them now because of what capt44's talking about.

   I have not noticed ANY shb as of yet in my hives. But that does not mean they are not here.
  The feral hives do not seem to be having a problem that I can "SEE" but I cant see much.
  Four of those hives have been in residence a long time, One hive in excess of 30 years. The rest are hives that have taken up residence recently...   It is in my best interest to see that those feral hives THRIVE where they are, and throw off multiple swarms.
    I have no intention of removing them, I want them there, I was just wondering if there was anything beyond a bit of syrup late this fall that might help them combat shb as Cap mentioned seeing.
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39 Hives and growing.  Havent found the end of the comfort zone yet.
RHBee
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« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2013, 06:21:45 PM »

  I have not noticed ANY shb as of yet in my hives. But that does not mean they are not here.
  The feral hives do not seem to be having a problem that I can "SEE" but I cant see much.
  Four of those hives have been in residence a long time, One hive in excess of 30 years. The rest are hives that have taken up residence recently...   It is in my best interest to see that those feral hives THRIVE where they are, and throw off multiple swarms.
    I have no intention of removing them, I want them there, I was just wondering if there was anything beyond a bit of syrup late this fall that might help them combat shb as Cap mentioned seeing.

You have to trust me on this one. SHB is the most "in your face" parasite that you can have besides a full blown wax moth take over. Every time I open my hives they are there. I trap with full bottom oil traps, kill them by the dozens and still see a few. If you see a small black beetle about the size of a lady bug in your hives you got SHB. Otherwise you are blessed to live in an area where they haven't made it yet or your climate is not favorable for their development. Either way count your blessings.
As far as helping a feral colony. Really there is nothing you can do more than feed them so that they don't become weak. Hive strength is the first line of defense.
Ray
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Later,
Ray
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