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Author Topic: Inner Covers  (Read 511 times)
Parksguyy
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« on: September 04, 2013, 10:35:14 AM »

Hey folks,
Please bear with me on this one ... I'm trying to understand the correct placement of ones inner cover.
Cdn beek here, so winter is always a concern to us and dealing with moist humid hives.  My inner covers all have a central hole in them and a notched rim.  In the summer my inner covers are placed with the notch facing upwards next to the outer cover.  According to everything I have read that is also the correct way it should be for the winter.  The notched opening acts as a ventilation hole as well as an upper entrance.  But I am repeatly being told that I should be reversing this for the winter ... I know, it may seem like I'm beating a dead horse here (hmm ... maybe thats that the best way to put it).  How do others treat this who actually experience similar winters?  My main concern is the fact that you are venting the brood chambers directly but there will still be warm moist humid air going up thru the central hole essentially being trapped next to the outer cover now that the vent is no longer there.  It just makes sense to vent the very top of the hive for things to work properly.  Now this is assuming that one is dealing with all this condensation in the first place.  Thanks
   
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2013, 11:01:32 AM »

It's not that critical.  They will find their way out a little easier with the notch down, but they will find their way anyway.  The moisture will find it's way out either way as well.  I like mine down.
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Michael Bush
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mikecva
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2013, 01:45:54 PM »

I went cheep and purchased inter covers without the notch. Instead, I have two screws in one end up about 3/8 of an inch. In the winter the screws are up to lift the outside cover and allow for venting. In the summer, the screws are down so the inner cover acts as an upper entrance.   -Mike
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dprater
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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2013, 08:10:59 PM »

Can I beat the dead horse a little too! I made intercovers that I use for feeding that have two holes the size of fruit jar lids with screen on the bottom of the hole so I can sit a jat in to feed when I need to. I keep a empty super that covers that on even if I'm not feeding. Gives them good ventilation and cooler I think. I'm in the south so that may also make difference also.

I'M new at this year two, still learning. So do bees need to go in and out the top?

dan
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T Beek
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« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2013, 06:05:38 AM »

I actually learned from an old Canadian Beek who insisted the notch goes down year round, which provides easier access instead of forcing them to go through the inner cover.  With the notch up how do they feed if they must be fed above with a feeder over the hole?

My hives have both top (a notched inner cover) and bottom entrances. 

Seems like the notch up position would serve more as a barrier to bees and limit condensation expiration from the hive over winter.
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capt44
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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2013, 06:19:00 AM »

I build my inner covers with a 3/4 inch notch for ventilation.
I also use put a 2 3/4 inch hole off center for a feeder jar and a medium super covering that.
I put the feeder hole off center so if something happens and the jar loses suction the syrup won't leak directly on the cluster.
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Richard Vardaman (capt44)
Parksguyy
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« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2013, 08:34:02 AM »

Thanks T Beek,
I've heard that very comment before, with the notch down the bees have direct access to the brood chamber, making it much easier for everyone.  As for feeding, I use hive top feeders with sit directly on the top brood chamber, inner covers are never used when feeders are on to prevent robbing. 
Thanks
Kerry

I actually learned from an old Canadian Beek who insisted the notch goes down year round, which provides easier access instead of forcing them to go through the inner cover.  With the notch up how do they feed if they must be fed above with a feeder over the hole?

My hives have both top (a notched inner cover) and bottom entrances. 

Seems like the notch up position would serve more as a barrier to bees and limit condensation expiration from the hive over winter.

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