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Author Topic: Could this be a Queen?  (Read 1244 times)
Carol
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« on: August 28, 2013, 02:47:04 PM »



Could this be a Queen?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2013, 03:19:51 PM »

Not seeing it in three dimensions makes it hard to tell.  If he abdomen was curled down, it seems long enough.  It is unusual (but no unheard of) to have markings identical to the workers.  So my instinct is that it is not and it's just a long worker.
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Michael Bush
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Carol
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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2013, 03:30:32 PM »

Michael...   long worker as in "laying" worker?
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kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2013, 03:55:02 PM »

can't be sure from the pic, but are those eggs in the center of the cells?  why are you worried about laying workers?
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Carol
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2013, 05:16:26 PM »

Kathyp...this hive swarmed twice that I know of....don't know for sure that I have a Queen.
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capt44
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« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2013, 05:46:00 PM »

I've found queens in some my NUCs that were hard to distinguish.
Especially young queens
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Richard Vardaman (capt44)
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« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2013, 05:52:19 PM »

Quote
.don't know for sure that I have a Queen.

bottom right.  looks like eggs in the bottom of those cells, although it could be reflection. did you take any other pics.  put them on your computer and look for eggs and very small larvae.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Carol
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« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2013, 07:41:57 PM »

I posted a few more pictures on my blog   www.wildlifearoundus.blogspot.com   they did not have to be resized smaller so a bit easier to see.

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kathyp
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« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2013, 08:10:14 PM »

http://lh6.ggpht.com/-sZ08kSC2EqQ/Uh47FzcU1iI/AAAAAAAAEeU/wSls-32C5r4/s1600-h/029cs%25255B4%25255D.jpg

this is probalby the best frame.  next time you (or anyone) takes pics try to shoot down into the bottom of the cells.  not at an angle to the frame.  what's in the bottom and how it's positioned is what we need to see.  other than that, you got some good shots  Wink

i am looking at the pics on a 37 inch screen with the picture enlarged.  other than the obvious brood, i'm afraid i can't really reassure you that you are ok.  i didn't see the queen and i didn't positively identify any eggs or younger brood.

when do you think this queen would have hatched?  on the plus side, you seem to have plenty of drones, so we can assume she would have had plenty to mate with in the area.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Carol
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« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2013, 08:21:26 PM »

Kathyp....last swarm was on July 29th....I guess she would have emerged sometime after that. Michael Bush did not think the picture I circled above was a Queen...I've been over and over the pictures and that was the closest I could come to one...guess I was wrong.
Everything I've read seems to point to the hive having a Queen: bringing in pollen, good natured....no stings again ....but I would like to be sure before too much time has passed and the hive is beyond saving. I can get them another Queen if need be.

Some of the pictures on the blog look like larva and even a few capped cells...but I did not see them when I had them in my hand. A few times Jim told me to hold the frame so he could get a good shot and all I can think of is I forgot to check it or there were too many bees on it when I first looked.

Jim is getting better with the pics...we'll keep trying.
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Carol
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« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2013, 08:26:49 PM »

Kathyp....I just reread your post and you definately did see brood?  Good...I am looking at and zooming in on them on a computer...37" screen ...what a deal!...guess I need to figure out how to hook mine up too.

I appreciate everyone who takes time to check my pictures and give me advice. I never know if I am seeing what I think I am seeing or if I am seeing what I want to see...as with the "Queen"  circled above.

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kathyp
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« Reply #11 on: August 28, 2013, 08:50:24 PM »

you need to go back and find younger larva and eggs.  what you have there is about to be capped but i could not find anything younger.  that doesn't mean it's not there.  i just couldn't see it.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Carol
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« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2013, 08:57:39 PM »

I'll go through the pictures again...but I don't think I'll see anthing else.  I will check those from the last check incase I missed them. Thanks.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2013, 12:06:02 AM »

Michael...   long worker as in "laying" worker?

No, there are different depths of brood cells, often on the same frame, for both workers and drones.  Result--ones sees short stubby drones, wider drones, and short, average, and longer workers.  The breath and depth of the cell the egg is laid in determines the size of bee that emerges.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2013, 08:03:34 AM »

>long worker as in "laying" worker?

No... some workers, especially field bees, have stretched their abdomen more for hauling nectar and are noticeably longer than other bees.  And there is also the possibility of an intercaste bee that is sort of a half queen.  But I would guess it's just a worker.
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Michael Bush
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Carol
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« Reply #15 on: August 31, 2013, 11:13:43 AM »

If a young Queen looks similar to a worker....how long does it take for her look to change.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2013, 12:49:06 PM »

>If a young Queen looks similar to a worker....how long does it take for her look to change.

Typically a young queen is not marked like a worker.  She tends to be either solid colored or more tiger striped than straight stripes like a worker.  But she is small and that look changes when she mates which is usually within two weeks of when she emerged.  Then she gets much larger.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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