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Author Topic: My first varroa count....  (Read 620 times)
MsCarol
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« on: August 26, 2013, 06:48:30 PM »

OK, I am not sure if I should be here or on another branch....the mods can herd me over if I am in the wrong place.

I KNOW these questions have been asked a thousand times, but filtering out the archives isn't all that simple.....especially when not knowing the right questions to ask.

Last evening (~ 24 hours ago) I slipped the IPM boards slathered with Vaseline for a (my first) mite count . I have screened bottom hives which I like. Pulled out the bottom board 24 hours nearly to the money. (Actually put them back as I want to do a 72 hour count as well)

The big hive which has 5 medium boxes on it right now with 2 filled pretty much with brood (They don't like the one plastic/plastic frame I dropped in after swiping some brood for the little hive). The count was 35 mites + 3 hive beetles swimming - that I squashed immediately. I think that is under the "acceptable level"

Second little hive with barely one medium filled yet - they ARE gaining - had 10.

Should I dust and powder the little hive to "clean them up"..... or more correctly have them clean themselves up? Or leave well enough alone?

IF using the powdered sugar.....what temperature/humidity range is acceptable? I know TOO hot can be an issue and we are getting a last dose of summer with mid 90's this week.

Thanks to you all, I at least can SEE what I am looking for. Close study of the bees on the landing hasn't revealed any one carrying a mite. As near sighted as I am I still found I can comfortable watch the comings and goings from the side of the hive mere inches away. Really cool!!!
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2013, 10:39:55 PM »

Dusting with powdered sugar can help, the count in the larger hive isn't critical but if you're worried go for it.
The smaller hive actually has a larger Varroa infestation than the larger hive on a proportional basis.  That one I would definitely treat.

Hopguard, is a new commercial Varroa treatment made from the hop plant ( cheer ) and seems to be effective and organic based.  I have a hops plant growing on my bee yard fence and just drop a few hops into each this time of year.
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BingalingBees
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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2014, 01:01:38 PM »

I was under the impression hopguard (like oxalic acid) is best used when the colony is broodless around December 25th here in Western Washington?
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Brad Raspet - Mount Vernon, WA
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johng
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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2014, 02:20:21 PM »

I would be concerned with 35 mites this time of year. I like for the hives to start off in the spring with very low mite counts. As your hives start to build up for the spring your mite counts are going to explode. I would try and do a treatment before spring gets going and you have to add supers. If you decide not to treat early spring you will defiantly need to treat as soon as you pull your honey in early summer. JMHO 
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GLOCK
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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2014, 03:09:46 AM »

If you have that many on a sticky board I bet you'd be real shocked if you did a alcohol wash .
And powder sugar shake may work but OAV will kick there buts. Just saying
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Ken
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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2014, 05:14:39 AM »

The original post was in August. Probably a good time for treating with mite away, hop guard, api life var and such as it knocks the mite count down before winter bees are being raised.
Oxalic trickle is good in December when hives are at their least broodless stage in winter as there will be few mites locked under cappings with brood. Oxalic vapor would likely be effective at this time too.
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BingalingBees
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« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2014, 01:07:38 PM »

I don't believe Hopguard gets into the cells, Do people really use it outside of a broodless period? Seems like you'd be wasting your money if it's just killing mites outside the brood cells?
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Brad Raspet - Mount Vernon, WA
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Leather Jim
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« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2014, 10:12:15 AM »

Hopguard-3 treatments 1 week apart seems to be the ticket.
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