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Author Topic: Drilling hole for bottling bucket  (Read 632 times)
jdesq
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« on: September 02, 2013, 09:28:58 AM »

I want to  make a couple more bottling buckets and just bought new gate valves. It appears to need a 1 7/8" hole drilled in the buckets. Any hints or ideas on how to drill these. did you use a drill or grind a hole? Any ideas would be appreciated.
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2013, 09:39:42 AM »

there are a variety of drill bits for making holes.  i used a paddle type because that's what i could put my hands on.  it was not quite big enough so i enlarged it with a utility knife, then used a rasp to smooth the edges.  it was more complicated than it needed to be because someone doesn't put tools back...but even so, only took me about 15 min.

don't put to much pressure on the bucket when you drill.  take a sharpie or something and mark your hole first so that you know you are placing the gate properly.  you don't want it to high or to low.

other than placing it properly and not cracking the bucket by getting heavy handed, it's easy  grin

test it with water before you put honey in the bucket!
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sc-bee
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« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2013, 10:21:37 AM »

What you are looking for is called a hole saw. I beleive a 2 inch will do. It fits on the end of a drill bit. Take the valve with you when you buy the hole saw and hold them side by side, unless someone on here verifies it is 2 inch  Smiley
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John 3:16
Parksguyy
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2013, 12:26:41 PM »

Hey guys,
Hole saw it is, 2in one ... I recently made two bottling buckets myself ... worked like a charm!
Kerry
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capt44
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« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2013, 12:42:54 PM »

I used a hole saw that has the starter drill bit in the center to keep everything in place when sawing the hole.
I have the hole saws from 1 inch up to 4 inches.
The 2 3/4 inch saw is good for making holes for quart jars for feeders.
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Richard Vardaman (capt44)
tjc1
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« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2013, 04:34:27 PM »

First thing!!! Don't place the hole too low (thinking it's best to have it all the way down for drainage) or you won't be able to screw on the retaining ring!

Not having or wanting to buy a hole saw just for this use, I just put the gate on a piece of card stock and traced around it, cut that out and marked around it on the bucket with a sharpie, Then I carefully drilled all around just inside the line with a 1/4" bit (you can leave space between) and then cut out along the line with a sharp knife (a small blade is good). The plastic cuts easily.
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sc-bee
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« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2013, 04:36:50 PM »

First thing!!! Don't place the hole too low (thinking it's best to have it all the way down for drainage) or you won't be able to screw on the retaining ring!

Not having or wanting to buy a hole saw just for this use, I just put the gate on a piece of card stock and traced around it, cut that out and marked around it on the bucket with a sharpie, Then I carefully drilled all around just inside the line with a 1/4" bit (you can leave space between) and then cut out along the line with a sharp knife (a small blade is good). The plastic cuts easily.

That will work - I borrowed a hole saw. I also use a hole saw to make the feeder tops mentioned above. For me the feeders have worked out good and i don't cover with a super because my winters are fairly mild. Also it is inside feeding and I have had no problem with robbing.
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John 3:16
Nico
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« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2013, 07:17:17 PM »

Please use caution when attempting to fit a honey gate, measure the gate first, I have fitted two different brands of gates, both different sizes. The Chinese gate was about three mill. smaller than the gate I purchased from my equipment supplier. Nothing worse than trying to fit a gate into a hole that is too large.
Nico
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datsdajoke
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« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2013, 09:55:07 AM »

I've had great luck with a pipe of the exact diameter I wanted. I heated it with a propane torch and just pushed it through the plastic while rotating a bit to help the cutting.  I had some scrap pipe that was an exact fit for the honey gates I use, worked great. 

- Adam
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JWChesnut
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« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2013, 10:49:13 AM »

1 7/8" is the standard "interior door" hole.  A cheap-cheap hole saw made with a pilot and the cup like stamp metal cutter works like a charm on plastic buckets.  These can be picked up in the bargain bin at any hardware, often as a "door lock" installation kit.

I'll second the advice on making sure you have left room to fasten the nut on the inside.  Wanting to no leave a pool of honey at the bottom, I squeezed my layout on a couple of buckets only to learn after the fact that you need clearance to fasten the inner nut ring.
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sc-bee
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« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2013, 11:04:10 AM »

I've had great luck with a pipe of the exact diameter I wanted. I heated it with a propane torch and just pushed it through the plastic while rotating a bit to help the cutting.  I had some scrap pipe that was an exact fit for the honey gates I use, worked great.  

- Adam

Propane torches, metal pipes, melting plastic ---- you would be calling 911 to my house  jaw drop
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John 3:16
jdesq
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« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2013, 07:37:18 AM »

I ended using a 2 inch hole saw, worked great, very simple. Thanks for all the advice.
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