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Author Topic: Larvae and eggs - also queencups - why?  (Read 504 times)
tomiferris
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Location: Sonoma County, CA


« on: August 25, 2013, 11:56:06 PM »

I live in Northern CA - Sonoma County.  I inspected one of my hives about a week ago and noticed capped brood, open larvae, and eggs.  But I also noticed an unopened queen cup on the bottom of one of the frames I looked at (definitely a queen cup and not drone). The brood area is 4 mediums - this hive has been very strong in the last couple of years - I only inspected the top box of the brood area.  When I spotted the queen cup, I didn't want to chance ruining any others.  My question - why would they be raising a new queen when the old one seems to be doing her job? Isn't it late in the year to be doing that?

Thanks for any help/suggestions.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2013, 07:59:13 AM »

Assuming, by "cup" you mean there is no larvae in it, then it means absolutely nothing.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
tomiferris
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« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2013, 12:52:45 PM »

Sorry, actually what I meant is a capped queen cell. 
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2013, 01:48:04 PM »

Well, a capped queen cell is a horse of a different color...

The thing to try to narrow down is if they are swarming or superseding.  I would put that in the context of whether the hive is growing or shrinking and how many cells they made.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfallacies.htm#swarmcellsonbottom
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2013, 10:29:28 PM »

Supercedure is usually done with less than 6 queen cells and often only one or two.  Also of note is that if you find capped queen cells that indicate a supercedure is underway the chances that the queen has already been offed runs about 80%.  I've had hives off the queen as soon as there were dedicated queen cells, open, newly hatched larva.

Removing a supercedure cell is a recipe for disaster, or at least a queenless hive.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
10framer
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2013, 01:44:38 PM »

i have a hive that kept a viable queen cell or two around all season.  i think these bees are russian hybrids.  they finally succeeded in replacing the queen back in late july.
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