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Author Topic: How to reduce the entrance of top-entrance hives  (Read 447 times)
TwoHoneys
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« on: August 20, 2013, 03:16:32 PM »

Friends, some of my bees need food. And though I HATE to feed, I think I must.

Here's my question:

I use top-entrances on my Lang hives, and I've converted the bottom boards to feeders. However, because the entrances are created by propping them open with shims, I'm not sure of a good way to reduce the entrance. And I need to reduce those entrances to reduce the occurrence of robbing.

So, please offer suggestions about reducing the entrance of top-entrance hives.

Thanks a lot!

-Liz

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OldMech
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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2013, 04:45:50 PM »

Are you using Boardman feeders in the bottom?

   I am assuming that you ARE, and that the rest of the bottom entrance will be completely blocked, and that your top entrance will be the only way in... In which case, I personally do not think you will have any issue at all with robbing. Interested in hearing from others on this one!
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Vance G
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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2013, 05:59:01 PM »

Who are you to doubt Mcyver?  Duct tape is the answer to most things except what is 42!  Just duct tape over what you believe is unneeded for the bees to enter. 
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alfred
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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2013, 06:34:32 PM »

I just use a piece of shim to reduce my top entrances. I just break it off to the appropriate length and wedge it in.

Alfred
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rober
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« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2013, 06:38:25 PM »

cut a 1" to 3" notch out of the upper front edge of your inner cover. the bees then come & go thru the hole in the center of the inner cover.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2013, 10:49:42 AM »

I cut a piece of screen molding 2" short of the entire width of the entrance and nailed it to the cover in the center so it can pivot open and closed.
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Michael Bush
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2013, 11:58:23 PM »

The best solution I've found is to convert your old solid bottom boards to tops.  Turn them up-side-down with the entrance reduced installed.  I use bottomless hives, my brother uses screened bottom boards, the solid bottom boards are the best tops I can find, air vent and top entrance all in one, no shimming required.
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RHBee
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« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2013, 06:32:15 AM »

The best solution I've found is to convert your old solid bottom boards to tops.  Turn them up-side-down with the entrance reduced installed.  I use bottomless hives, my brother uses screened bottom boards, the solid bottom boards are the best tops I can find, air vent and top entrance all in one, no shimming required.

Ok Brian, You got my attention with the bottomless hives statement. Could you please elaborate?
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Later,
Ray
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2013, 08:58:34 PM »

The best solution I've found is to convert your old solid bottom boards to tops.  Turn them up-side-down with the entrance reduced installed.  I use bottomless hives, my brother uses screened bottom boards, the solid bottom boards are the best tops I can find, air vent and top entrance all in one, no shimming required.

Ok Brian, You got my attention with the bottomless hives statement. Could you please elaborate?

My hive stands are made thus: I cut a piece of 3/8 plywood 1.5 inches wider and 1.5 inches longer than the hive body it will support.  I then cut a 1X3 1.5 inches wider than the hive body. I then secure a 2X8 to each long side of the plywood sheet.  The 2X8 is 1st notched 1.5 inches by 3/4 inch at the top to fit the 1X3 so that 1 inch rises above the top edge of the 2X8 in a |_______________| fashion.  I set a slatted rack on the newly made hive stand and secure it with screws to the 1X3 with 4 screws.  The hive bodies are then stacked on top of the slatted rack.

The bees do not land on a landing board, they fly in and out both the front and back sides of the hives. They fly right up into the hive past the slatted rack and the excess bees festooning from it.  Any predators has to crawl unto the hive stand where they are attacked by large numbers of guard bees.

I must admit that my bee yard, like all my other fences is 6 feet high, 3 rail, 2X4 welded wire so most predators do not bother my bees as they have to get past 3 such fences to get the bee hives.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
T Beek
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« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2013, 07:56:40 AM »

My top entrances are simply a small notch (about 2") in the inner cover facing downward, thereby allowing the entrance to move up as the colony expands.  It can be reduce with a stuffing of grass or....like was said above.....some duct tape  Smiley
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