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Author Topic: Keep bees near sewage treatment plant?  (Read 2248 times)
RHBee
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« Reply #40 on: August 21, 2013, 03:55:42 PM »

We have a different growing problem here in Michigan.  Home owners insurance companies are canceling policies with hives on the properties.   

This just confirmed my belief that people really have lost all reason. Sometimes I feel like I'm living in a really bad novel. I guess I'm just getting old or my beliefs are way to Conservative.
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Ray
danno
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« Reply #41 on: August 21, 2013, 06:36:25 PM »

The bee sting allergy thing always get me.  If I asked 100 people if they are allergic, 60 to 70 would say yes. 
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Modenacart
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« Reply #42 on: August 21, 2013, 06:43:19 PM »

Quote from: RHBee link=topic=42396.msg363182#msg363182 date=1376993815
[quote author=Better.to.Bee.than.not link=topic=42396.msg363175#msg363175 date=1376980444


I I can understand ordinances against domestic livestock like chickens and such. Barnyards can have some pretty special smells and noises.

[/quote]
My chickens make far less noise than the majority if dogs in our area.  Plus they don't go around crapping and peeing on everyone's mailboxes.

By the way, webster's definition of livestock includes any animal keep for profit or pleasure. That oils include dogs or cats.
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RHBee
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« Reply #43 on: August 22, 2013, 07:25:05 AM »

Quote from: RHBee link=topic=42396.msg363182#msg363182 date=1376993815
[quote author=Better.to.Bee.than.not link=topic=42396.msg363175#msg363175 date=1376980444


I I can understand ordinances against domestic livestock like chickens and such. Barnyards can have some pretty special smells and noises.

My chickens make far less noise than the majority if dogs in our area.  Plus they don't go around crapping and peeing on everyone's mailboxes.

By the way, webster's definition of livestock includes any animal keep for profit or pleasure. That oils include dogs or cats.
[/quote]

Look, I said I understand not agree with.
If anything, I advocate less regulations and more reason. I didn't mean to ruffle any feathers grin. I've had chickens before and realize that a well maintained coop without a rooster doesn't smell and isn't loud. On the other hand, one poorly socialized and trained Labrador retriever or German Sheppard can make enough noise to drive a neighborhood insane.
It takes reason, responsibility and the ability to understand basic concepts to make any society work. Some how these traits have been lost. Because of this we are living in a world where the honeybee is regulated by a council of ignorance to a piece of property next to a sewage plant. I could go on but I really get tired of stating the obvious.
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Ray
RHBee
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« Reply #44 on: August 22, 2013, 07:32:56 AM »

The bee sting allergy thing always get me.  If I asked 100 people if they are allergic, 60 to 70 would say yes. 

That's exactly the type of ignorance I'm talking about danno. Almost everyone has some reaction to a sting but that doesn't mean they are allergic.
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Ray
danno
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« Reply #45 on: August 22, 2013, 07:52:58 AM »

The bee sting allergy thing always get me.  If I asked 100 people if they are allergic, 60 to 70 would say yes. 

That's exactly the type of ignorance I'm talking about danno. Almost everyone has some reaction to a sting but that doesn't mean they are allergic.
and it would also be a safe bet that 99 of those 100 have NEVER been stung by a honeybee
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RHBee
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« Reply #46 on: August 22, 2013, 08:37:07 AM »

The bee sting allergy thing always get me.  If I asked 100 people if they are allergic, 60 to 70 would say yes. 

That's exactly the type of ignorance I'm talking about danno. Almost everyone has some reaction to a sting but that doesn't mean they are allergic.
and it would also be a safe bet that 99 of those 100 have NEVER been stung by a honeybee

Ignorance again, thanks danno.
Quite a few people don't know the difference between a yellow jacket and a honeybee. As a kid the only time I ever got stung by a honeybee was when I was barefoot and stepped on one.
Yellow jackets and wasps were a different matter. I quickly learned the difference. Knowledge abolished ignorance,  the hard way. grin
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Ray
rober
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« Reply #47 on: August 22, 2013, 02:01:43 PM »

i had a neighbor who lives around the corner & is probably 3000' feet from my hives come to my door & tell me my bees came out of the ground & ambushed him & his daughter. i explained to him that he had a yellow jacket nest in his yard & needed to deal with it. i also told him that all of my bees wore collars & could be identified as being mine. he said he'd watch out for collared bees & left. i've not heard from him since. my local township keeps tracks of beeyards that they know of & refrains from spraying for mosquitos near those houses. the city health dept guy came by & asked what else they could do to help the bees. i told him to plant clover in all the parks & on all public ground.
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Bee Curious
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« Reply #48 on: August 22, 2013, 10:38:28 PM »

This part don't sound too promising:



But is beats an all out ban. Sadly those neighbors with the allergic child will most likely never listen to reason, including the fact that the boy carry and learn to use the epi-pen on himself as soon as he is able. There are far more other stinging insects out there in the real world then the honey bees. My guess is one or both parents are afraid themselves.
I doubt it sank in that the hive is also getting larger as the summer progresses is partially because the bees are storing honey.

It does sound like it was a well laid out argument in FAVOR of bee keeping. I applaud the effort to educate all those present. Although the idea of a community bee yard isn't a bad one, I can also see it a recipe for vandals to do a whole lot of damage to a number of beeks in a short span of time. Would the city support the cost of insuring those hives against such a possibility?

We did an amazing job, but there is more to do, trying to get the right people in the administration (and not the wrong people who seem to have predetermined ideas) to work on the ordinance with input from beekeepers on best-practices regulations.  Stay tuned.
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