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Author Topic: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter  (Read 1533 times)

Offline PLAN-B

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How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« on: August 15, 2013, 09:20:50 PM »
How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter or any other time?
I did a shake out a weeks ago and let the bees from my other hives help themselves to the honey that was stored in the frames of the now empty hive... Turned the hive bodies on end and in a blink they were done... I placed these frames in the freezer to kill any pest that may have laid eggs etc... After three days in the freezer i removed them and put them back in a hive body standing on end with a piece of metal over them to keep them somewhat dry... When i looked at them today i seen a good number of hive beetles running around... What am i doing wrong. How do i go about storing a number of frames without pest tearing them apart???  :(   The frames also looked to be getting a little mildew on them? :shock: Any advice is appreciated...
Marshall

Offline forrestcav

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2013, 10:43:46 PM »
plastic garbage bag and paramoth would be my suggestion.
Just a beek trying to get ready for winter.

Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2013, 11:19:30 PM »
plastic garbage bag and paramoth would be my suggestion.

Metal garbage can is better, mice can't chew through it like they can plastic.  They will chew through plastic to get to the source of the honey smell.
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Offline Joe D

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2013, 12:11:32 AM »
The metal trash cans would be better, but I put frames in super and put them in 55 gal trash bags.  They are stored in my shop, on a shelf about a foot off the floor.  I have rat traps and bait under shelf and other places in the shop.   I let the bees clean the frames for a few days, out in the sun away from the hives.  Let them get dried out good and then store.  Hope this helps.



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Offline millipede

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2013, 01:26:15 AM »
After you remove them from the freezer you have make sure they are at room temperature and all the condensation has dried off of them before you place them in something the beetles and moths cannot get in like a plastic trash bag that is sealed. Placing that in a metal trash can will keep the mice out.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2013, 09:29:19 AM »
In the boxes with a lid and a bottom and outside where they will freeze.

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Offline rober

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2013, 10:00:16 AM »
same as michael but in an unheated shed. you might be better off bagged or in a metal trash can since it rarely freezes where you are.

Offline PLAN-B

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2013, 11:15:23 AM »
Thanks for all the comments.. I wonder what the commercial guys do with hundreds of hives? Must be pretty costly to store all those frames... Yikes.... Anyhow, thanks for the help...
Marshall

Offline forrestcav

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2013, 11:42:29 AM »
I've seen a pic or two and they stack them in the boxes from floor to ceiling in a separate shed
Just a beek trying to get ready for winter.

Offline Moots

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2013, 11:48:57 AM »
B,
Another option that I've seen is to store them outside in the open air, but under a shelter, on a rack where the frames are exposed.  The theory being that the moths don't like the light and breeze that moves through them.

Thinking I might just stack them in the barn with a cover on them and see how it goes...I know quite a few people who say that's all they do and have never had a problem.
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Offline forrestcav

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2013, 11:56:34 AM »
I left some of my brood frames laying out in the open air earlier this year. Now I need new foundation for them. I would try to seal the moths out. I also wouldn't want them laying in a barn because of rodents.
Just a beek trying to get ready for winter.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2013, 12:11:14 PM »
If I had the money and I lived in a hot climate, I'd probably build a cold room where I could freeze it and where moths can't get in.  Then I could freeze the comb to kill all the eggs, and then let it all thaw and the moths can't get to it...
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Offline mikecva

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2013, 12:29:13 PM »
I have used moth crystals (NOT moth balls) for years. I stack the boxes on aluminum foil about a foot off the ground, about 8 high (sorry, never counted), add a paper plate with 2-3 table spoons of moth crystals, cover with aluminum foil pinched down and a board or two across the top for weight. In spring, I air out the boxes for one or two weeks before putting on a hive.
I have tried long term air drying but the racoons and such soon learn where the boxes are, even when 4 feet off the ground something was getting to them.   -Mike
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Offline sc-bee

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2013, 01:42:59 PM »
Thinking I might just stack them in the barn with a cover on them and see how it goes...I know quite a few people who say that's all they do and have never had a problem.

With no treatment at all.  If that is the plan it did not work for my buddy. But them again do you run excluders? Has there been any brood in your honey supers? If never any brood in your supers it increases the odds of keeping it.

No one has mentioned bt?
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Offline L Daxon

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2013, 02:29:20 PM »
This year I bought two extra telescoping covers.  I  put rollers on the top of one of them that is going to be used as the bottom of my stack. After letting the girls clean all the honey residue in the frames, then freezing all the frames and boxes, then making sure they are dry, I will stack the wooden supers filled with frames one on top of the other. (I'll probably have 6 supers of frames).  The top box will have the second telescoping cover on it.  If there appears to be any gaps between the supers, I will probably duct tape the gaps.  I may pull a trash bag down over the whole stack and duct tape it to the bottom telescoping cover.  I am also thinking about cutting a hole somewhere in the trash bag and duct taping some very fine screen to it for ventilation.  Then I will roll the whole thing out onto my covered back porch or into my garage to freeze again off and on in the winter.

I used this rolling telescopic cover to stack my honey filled supers both before and after they were extracted and it was great.  The edges of the upside down telescopic cover caught any of the dripping honey.  I love being able to roll the supers around.

I am sure some of you handy, wood working guys could make a nice rolling cart with a side, but since I don't have a woodworking shop, I just bought the extra covers and turned them upside down.  Perfect fit!
Linda D in OKC
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Offline forrestcav

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #15 on: August 16, 2013, 03:54:09 PM »
I did the telescoping cover thing when I pulled my supers this year. Which gave me the idea to build a top and bottom out of some heavy ply/OSB with a raised lip and seal the heck out of it.
I acquired a large steel electrical box. 18D x 24Wx 6ft Hight. I plan to seal it up add racks for frames and also store equipment in it. The upper area I hace sectioned off will easily hold 40 deep  frames maybe more. I can lay a little paramoth in there to help repel.
Just a beek trying to get ready for winter.

Offline PLAN-B

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #16 on: August 16, 2013, 09:01:17 PM »
Moots I've seen someone storing their hives in open air and that's what i was attempting... Have't seen any moths, but about 15 or 20 hive beetles running all over.... not sure about that open air method  :? lol.
As always thanks for all the input from everyone...Michael Bush ---If i had money i would do all sorts of things / unfortunately that's not the case for most of us.... c'mon lottery  :-D
Marshall

Offline Jim 134

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #17 on: August 16, 2013, 09:20:13 PM »
If I had the money and I lived in a hot climate, I'd probably build a cold room where I could freeze it and where moths can't get in.  Then I could freeze the comb to kill all the eggs, and then let it all thaw and the moths can't get to it...

 :th_thumbsupup: :th_thumbsupup:

   Just keep the rodents out and in about October through April not too many  wax moths or SHB outside or in a unheated shed in Cow Hampshire   :roll:



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Offline PeeVee

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2013, 08:06:04 AM »
While I have not tried this: I saw an article a couple years ago where the author had an open shed where the individual frames were hung from the rafters. Open air and light were the preservatives. A "lean-to" configuration should be adequate. I seem to remember the frames were hung strung on cord.
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Offline hiram.ga.bee.man

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2013, 09:40:55 AM »
Supplies needed: 4 wheel rolling dolly, supers you want to protect, moth crystals like you hang on a closet rod (active ingredient must start with the letter 'p'), two queen excluders, two pieces of aluminum house/window screen, two bottom boards, roll of blue painters tape and 2 empty supers. Step 1 freeze supers in a deep freezer. Step 2 set a rolling dolly on the floor, then a bottom board, then a queen excluder, then aluminum house screen, now stack frozen bug free supers almost as high as you can reach. Step 3 now place on top of your frozen supers one empty super, then a queen excluder, then house screen, then lay your moth crystals on top of the excluder, then an empty super, then set a bottom board on top of your stack. Step 4 run a strip of blue tape around all the joints between your supers to prevent moth intrusion. Step 5 Now wheel, remember it is on a dolly, the whole stack into a corner out of the way for winter storage. Store in your garage or storage building, not on dirt/gravel base due to moisture in the ground causing mildew on all your combs.

Why this method works? Supers are sanitized, mice can't eat through metal excluder, moth can't eat through aluminum screen, and having a bottom board top and bottom allows for natural air flow to prevent mildew in a lower humidity environment like garage in your house.

Just what works for me.
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Offline hiram.ga.bee.man

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2013, 09:59:08 AM »
I would like to add regarding the method i mentioned above, when you take your supers off the stack in the spring, your supers will look like the day you put them on the stack, perfect; no mildew, no mice, no ants, no spiders, no hive beetles, no moths, just perfectly drawn comb.
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Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: How does everyone store their drawn frames through winter
« Reply #21 on: August 17, 2013, 11:05:58 PM »
My initial reply said use a garbage can because it would be better than plastic, which it would, and I answered the question asked.
Now the way I do it is as follows:
After extracting I let the bees clean out the frames by putting them back on the hive for a few days.
I then set the supers full of frames on an upside down telescopic top that has a moving screen in it (a frame covered with aluminum door screen).
I stack the supers as high as eight mediums high and cover with another moving screen on top (I have a bad back and shoulders so I can only stack to shoulder level).
They can be stacked either inside or outside, the important point is keep the screens in place to prevent wax moths and shb out.
Outside they will usually freeze several different times during the winter, killed eggs of wax moth and shb.
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