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Author Topic: Can you spot the varroa mite?  (Read 1317 times)
GSF
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« on: August 12, 2013, 07:31:48 PM »

For training purposes don't say where just say yes or no, later on I'll point it out if someone doesn't see it.

Can you spot the varroa mite?



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John Wayne
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« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2013, 07:51:12 PM »

Why of course, can't you. Especially with the magnified camera lens grin
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John 3:16
hjon71
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« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2013, 08:48:27 PM »

I think I can
I think I can
I think I can
 tongue
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MsCarol
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« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2013, 08:58:51 PM »

OH stop torturing us NEW BEES!!

OK I agree this is a good exercise.....but I am still lost.

 I am sure "seeing" it for the first time will be the same OH WOW of the first time spotting the queen.
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GSF
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« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2013, 09:34:22 PM »

I'll point it out probably tomorrow afternoon.  It "has" to be on a stray bee - my girls are too pure to be tainted  angel
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John Wayne
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« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2013, 12:28:53 AM »

I was looking for a larger, easier to spot version but I THINK I found a smaller one....
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RC
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« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2013, 07:27:27 AM »

Come on, people. Stevie Wonder could see it. grin
Don't look for the mite. Look for something out of the ordinary.
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Carol
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« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2013, 09:09:20 AM »

I had to zoom way in to spot it....then couldn't find it when I zoomed out...did that a few times...now I know where it is...at least I think I do.   goodpost
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Finski
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« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2013, 10:08:18 AM »

.

Can I, no I cannot. So mad idea.

.
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GSF
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« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2013, 02:29:17 PM »

Okay,

Almost dead center of the frame, to the left and up a little. The bee has its back to you and there's an open space behind the bee. Look right between the wings. Little red zit looking something. That's it. You may have to increase magnification for a better view. Hope this was fun & educational.
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John Wayne
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« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2013, 03:35:57 PM »

Hope this was fun & educational.

I saw first mites in year 1982. Very fun. Mite has killed lots of hives from me.
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Spear
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« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2013, 04:42:48 PM »

I see it but is that not a bit small to be a varroa mite?  huh From what I've seen and heard if bees were human sized the varroa mite would be about rabbit size. Please correct me if I'm wrong here...
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Finski
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« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2013, 04:46:39 PM »

.
Varroa is varroa size.

.
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10framer
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« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2013, 05:04:11 PM »

I see it but is that not a bit small to be a varroa mite?  huh From what I've seen and heard if bees were human sized the varroa mite would be about rabbit size. Please correct me if I'm wrong here...

i think it's the perspective of the picture plus it's partially buried in the hair.  i had a hard time finding it last night but my eyes are not what they were a few years ago.
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Vance G
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« Reply #14 on: August 13, 2013, 08:33:44 PM »

Yeah it is indeed stevie wonder obvious
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GSF
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« Reply #15 on: August 13, 2013, 09:10:42 PM »

I have a heck of a camera - Nikon D80. Guess it's time for me to break out the old DVD that came with it and get versed again with it. I used to could take a heck of a shot but I haven't fooled with it much in the last two or three years.
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John Wayne
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« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2013, 12:53:35 AM »

Good pic. I hate those things.
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Finski
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« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2013, 03:15:30 AM »



i think it's the perspective of the picture plus it's partially buried in the hair. 

Usual situation of mites are between abdomen scales. There skin is easy to penetrate.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2013, 11:57:51 AM »

I can't say for sure if there is or isn't a Varroa in your picture.  Here's one with the circled for those who want a scale and want to know what they look like on a bee...
http://www.bushfarms.com/images/Varroa2.jpg
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Michael Bush
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MsCarol
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« Reply #19 on: August 14, 2013, 09:25:03 PM »

FINALLY.....Now I see it.

Me thinks I need to order a new set of eyes!!  rolleyes

The mites are tiny things.

Question: can they be found on dead bees or do they "abandon ship" as soon as the gal is fading?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2013, 09:05:46 AM »

>can they be found on dead bees or do they "abandon ship" as soon as the gal is fading?

They abandon ship.
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Michael Bush
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JWChesnut
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« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2013, 12:45:37 PM »


Usual situation of mites are between abdomen scales. There skin is easy to penetrate.

Finski, language barrier or no, has the key information in this silly thread.  Phoretic mites reside between abdomen scales on the ventral side.  The pix you see of them hitchhiking on the bee thorax or legs are totally misleading.   This is why you must do a shake or alcohol wash to have an accurate count.

I have heard from beginning beekeepers "I don't have mites, I don't see them when I watch the entrance, I solved the mite problem by "Not Treating"."   I take a cup of their bees and show them the mites by doing a sugar shake.  You see this same denial on this forum.

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GSF
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« Reply #22 on: August 15, 2013, 03:57:14 PM »


Usual situation of mites are between abdomen scales. There skin is easy to penetrate.

Finski, language barrier or no, has the key information in this silly thread.  Phoretic mites reside between abdomen scales on the ventral side.  The pix you see of them hitchhiking on the bee thorax or legs are totally misleading.   This is why you must do a shake or alcohol wash to have an accurate count.

I have heard from beginning beekeepers "I don't have mites, I don't see them when I watch the entrance, I solved the mite problem by "Not Treating"."   I take a cup of their bees and show them the mites by doing a sugar shake.  You see this same denial on this forum.



JW - I don't get what you're saying.

Also, Finski doesn't have a language barrier problem he has a people problem. Calling folks names isn't a language barrier problem. Folks from other countries don't have any problem communicating decently. He just has a miserable life or something.

Ever heard of the American Chestnut Society folks? We have chestnuts down in our woods. Has to be the American because no one would have ever went back there just to plant them. I sure hope they are successful in breeding back and creating a resistant strain. One of our dulcimers is made from wormy chestnut wood. A fellow in Townsend Tn built it out of lumber he got from a huge barn tear down years ago.
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John Wayne
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« Reply #23 on: August 15, 2013, 04:37:37 PM »

Also, Finski doesn't have a language barrier problem he has a people problem. Calling folks names isn't a language barrier problem. Folks from other countries don't have any problem communicating decently. He just has a miserable life or something.


Come on dude it's your thread play nice, just  grin and bear it!
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John 3:16
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« Reply #24 on: August 15, 2013, 05:10:14 PM »


Ever heard of the American Chestnut Society folks? We have chestnuts down in our woods. Has to be the American because no one would have ever went back there just to plant them. I sure hope they are successful in breeding back and creating a resistant strain. One of our dulcimers is made from wormy chestnut wood. A fellow in Townsend Tn built it out of lumber he got from a huge barn tear down years ago.


I  send them membership every year http://www.acf.org/ .  Their backcrossing program is only one of several approaches being tried. Chestnuts are close to making a comeback.
There are several of the resistant crosses planted on the Washington DC mall, as memorials to USDA employees lost in Afghanistan.
There are relictual stands in several states and outplanted orchards in Wisconsin and Oregon.  The famous Salem Wisconsin outlier (a planted woodlot) now has blight, but trees are being protected by deliberately injecting hypo-virulent strains.  I know the relicts in Georgia and Alabama have been sampled for resistance (as opposed to avoiding the blight by being remote from Red Oak, the alternate host of the fungus).

Beekeepers might be interested that the toxic nature of the fungus is its release of Oxalic Acid-- damages the trees delicate cambium.

 Pix of a blight-resistant Memorial American Chestnut planted at USDA headquarters on Washington DC Mall.


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GSF
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« Reply #25 on: August 15, 2013, 09:08:41 PM »

JW, you probably already know this. The story behind the story of my wife's dulcimer is years ago they came through the mountains and warned folks about the blight coming through. They encouraged them to cut down all the chestnuts they could and build new barns, cabins, or what not. I guess they were trying to create a barrier by having the trees out of the way. I need to take a trek back there and look to see if they are still around. I remember back in the 70s they were probably at least a foot across in width. Someone told me they theorized it was sprouts off of the dead ones.

SC; I was being nice angel
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"Life is hard, It's even harder when you're stupid."

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