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Author Topic: Frame cleanup  (Read 916 times)

Offline Sunnyboy2

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Frame cleanup
« on: August 04, 2013, 11:40:28 PM »
I made my first honey harvest yesterday (yea!).  I harvested a few frames from a Lang hive.  I'm cutting out the comb as i went with a variation of foundationless frames. 
BUT. . . My frames are a sticky mess.  How should I clean the frames before replacing, or should i just leave the sticky on the wood frames.  Thanks for the thoughts.

Offline Wolfer

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2013, 11:46:22 PM »
Leave the frames wet and put them back on the hive. They'll be sticky free very shortly.

Offline GSF

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2013, 10:02:20 AM »
Wolfer - Wouldn't that encourage robbing? (Newbie question)
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Online Steel Tiger

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2013, 12:03:54 PM »
Wolfer - Wouldn't that encourage robbing? (Newbie question)
Unless it's a weak hive, the bees will clean the frames well before any attempts of robbing. I've had honey dripping in the hives after an inspection due to cross combs breaking. Many bees in the hive go right to work cleaning it up before I even get the hive put back together.

Offline hjon71

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2013, 01:18:59 PM »
+1 for Woofer

I put my frames back in the super and set on end where I open feed. Took a couple days for the bees to find and clean it. But they were busy on a good flow. I only have 1 hive. So that's another option.
Quite difficult matters can be explained even to a slow-witted man, if only he has not already adopted a wrong opinion about them; but the simplest things cannot be made clear even to a very intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he already knows, and knows indubitably, the truth of the matter under consideration. -Leo Tolstoy

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2013, 01:19:58 PM »
You will probably also find the bees replace the comb pretty quickly if there is a flow on.
Jim
That is if you put them back in the hive.
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Offline danno

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2013, 01:35:35 PM »
If there is a flow going on, robbing wont be a problem.  "Just a few frame" just set them outside and they will be clean and dry in no time.  

Offline Moots

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2013, 02:58:35 PM »
On this topic, a few other questions...

I pulled honey this weekend, since there isn't a flow going on and I only pulled frames that were 100% capped, I don't think any of my hives really need the boxes back on at this time.  Therefore, I just put the boxes out near my hives for the bees to clean up.

First, I know I want to avoid the rain getting these boxes while I have them out...I picked them up last night for that reason.  When I put them back out this morning, I attempted to rig a make shift roof in case we get rain while I'm at work, however, if it does rain, I'm sure they will get wet to some degree.  If so, exactly how bad is that and what's the best way to handle it from there?

Secondly, how do I know when the bees are done cleaning them up?....I'm assuming when they simple quit visiting them...Correct?

Third,  Best storing options for this comb? Are frames in the boxes stacked in a barn and covered sufficient or do I have to take extra steps to really seal them up?....Or, does that cause other issues, i.e. mold, etc?
My other option is a spare bedroom....Not sure how that one will go over with the wife.  :-D
"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2013, 03:45:32 PM »
I would put the wets back on the hives to clean up.  No point encouraging robbing.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline danno

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2013, 04:27:33 PM »
I built a few pallets just for drying supers.   These are basic pallets but with a sheet of plywood over the top.   The solid top catches alot of wax flakes.   I stack supers on them criss / crossing so the bee's can get in on the ends at any level.  On the top of each stack I put a telescoping cover and at time have even used bottom boards to cover.   If it rains the only part of the frame that gets wet are the ears.    I ran about 30 supers yesterday and judging from the activity they should by dry by the end of the day today.  To store I simply stack them 15 high on clean drip trays in the honey house.  As far as worrying about pest I dont.  Wax moth isn't a huge problem in honey frames that have never been layed in.  I do get a occasional mouse that slips in by the sides of my overhead door but I make sure they have a single feeding mouse block to chew on before they even get all the way in.  Plus I keep the perimeter mowed.   I should mention I dont keep many colonies at my farm.  Mostly swarms from this years that become replacements for deadout and a few that over wintered from last year.   This year I have 7 back in the field 

Offline Moots

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #10 on: August 05, 2013, 05:42:41 PM »
I would put the wets back on the hives to clean up.  No point encouraging robbing.


Michael,
My fear there was giving the bees to much space to defend that they did not need...Are you saying I should put them back on even though not needed, but just long enough for clean up?  Maybe a few days or a week then remove again?
"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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Offline Sunnyboy2

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2013, 01:26:58 AM »
Thank you all for your input.  Seems like a basic thing, but I never thought about it until i pulled the frames.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #12 on: August 06, 2013, 11:03:50 AM »
>My fear there was giving the bees to much space to defend that they did not need...Are you saying I should put them back on even though not needed, but just long enough for clean up?  Maybe a few days or a week then remove again?

Yes.  They will treat it as a spill and quickly clean it up.  I would also reduce entrances during the time of the cleanup to try to prevent robbing.  Leaving them in the open this time of year if there is a dearth will set off a feeding frenzy that makes sharks look tame...

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline hjon71

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Re: Frame cleanup
« Reply #13 on: August 06, 2013, 11:45:25 AM »
Quote
  Leaving them in the open this time of year if there is a dearth will set off a feeding frenzy that makes sharks look tame...




Instead of Sharknado it could be Beenado....hello Hollywood.  The next great movie idea right there.Off topic I know....
Quite difficult matters can be explained even to a slow-witted man, if only he has not already adopted a wrong opinion about them; but the simplest things cannot be made clear even to a very intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he already knows, and knows indubitably, the truth of the matter under consideration. -Leo Tolstoy

 

anything