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Author Topic: Nuc Vs Package  (Read 1787 times)
jdesq
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« on: January 16, 2006, 04:23:51 PM »

I lost 3 hives to yellow jackets this fall(all I have) now I have to start over this spring.  Is a nuc better than a 3lb package or vice versa.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2006, 07:08:04 PM »

They are both fine.  If you want to go to small cell, I'd get the package and put them on small cell foundation.  If you want to go with mediums (less lifting) I'd buy the package and put them in a medium. If you want to go with deeps and standard cell size, I'd buy the nuc.
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Michael Bush
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ian michael davison
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« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2006, 07:34:46 PM »

Hi all
In th Uk we have very few suppliers of packages and the price for a 6 frame nuc/colony from the countrys largest supplier is about £135.00(just to make you guys feel better)

I think that in any conditions a nuc will do better and the bees are under less stress. Less is required of them to get established and you have emerging young bees straight away rather than waiting for the queen to come onto full lay and a full brood cycle with the older bees dying before the young ones start to emerge and replace the dwindling numbers.


Regards Ian
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amymcg
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« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2006, 10:29:59 PM »

Different reasons for going with either option as Michael pointed out.

If you're using deeps, I would definitely get a nuc, it will have a faster buildup.  I started with a nuc this year and except for the 5 frames they came on, they had to draw 35 frames of foundation. I was able to take 60 pounds of honey from that hive. I doubt I would have had that surplus with a package.
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Tyrone
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2006, 12:59:41 PM »

I'm putting out my first hives this year and had intended on using 8-frame mediums all the way and buying packaged bees.  I have found out about a supplier about 4 hours away who sells 4-frame nucs for a little over $50 each.  Now I'm thinking about maybe buying a couple of deeps and buying the nucs and topping them with the mediums.  Any thoughts as to whether I should go this way or stay with my original plan?  TIA....T
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TwT
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2006, 01:14:15 PM »

Quote from: jdesq
I lost 3 hives to yellow jackets this fall(all I have) now I have to start over this spring.  Is a nuc better than a 3lb package or vice versa.


 all good info above, but if the hives he losed already has drawn comb that is still in good shape then wouldn't a package take off fast also? he did say he losed the hive's to yellow jackets,  it would cost less than a nuc.  Guest my question would be is the comb still in good shape? just my thoughts.
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Finsky
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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2006, 01:18:24 PM »

I should take nucs. They developes much more faster. But I would ask if the seller put double size hive to you. It cost but it gives  back first summer.  Ask what he wants if put 4 frames brood and 2 frames more bees.

Another trick is to put two nucs  one on top of another and thin bottom board between them. Hives fly to opposite direction. -

One trick is to put  7- 10 W terrarium heater on bottom board. It gives speed.

But it depends how many brood frames are included in those 4 frames.
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Apis629
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« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2006, 08:55:55 PM »

Quote
I lost 3 hives to yellow jackets this fall(all I have) now I have to start over this spring.


Do you think there may be a different underlying problem?  I don't think a  full-size healthy colony would be killed by yellow jackets.

Anyways, with relevence to package vs. nuc I'd like to point out this one fact...they cannot ship nucs but they can ship packages.  (It's illegal to ship frame packages/nucs through the mail)
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latebee
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2006, 12:58:05 PM »

Finman said--------------
Quote
One trick is to put 7-10 W terrarium heater on bottom board. It gives speed.
--------------------I  think this is a great idea. I do have a few questions---at what average daytime temperature would you turn the heater on and approximately when would you turn it off? From some of your previous posts I recall that you said to help small colonies survive winter you have placed these heaters on the side of the hive,but I do not recall how this plan worked for you. Sounds interesting enough. Thanks Cheesy
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Finsky
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« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2006, 01:23:47 PM »

Quote from: latebee
at what average daytime temperature would you turn the heater on and approximately when would you turn it off?


Actually I live in capital city and I have  150 km trip to my hives.
Heaters are all the time on at spring. This spring I put thermostat which turn  off circuit when day temperature rise to 15C.   When day tempereture is 20C I may see that bees have too hot.

Quote
you said to help small colonies survive winter you have placed these heaters on the side of the hive,but I do not recall how this plan worked for you.


During 2 winters I have had 2 frame colony over winter. They succeeded splended. Just now I have again 2 small colonies and 3W heaters inside hives. Out temperature has been -25C during a week. Hives are in the firewood shelter.  Another colony is two twist size.  Temperature rised tomorrow to -9C and netx day
 to -2C.

Long period of cold is dangerous, 1-1,5 month. Bees go to some corner and use food to end.

It is impossible to get honey 2-frame colony with the help of itself. I give emerging brood fames to hive . When it has whole box bees since that it will develope in normal way.  So I have got 150 lbs average yields from those dwarfs. I even foraging powers of hives or put hives together.

---------------------------

I know that USA is a vast country and you have many kind of weathers there.
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