Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
November 23, 2014, 11:33:18 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Finding an out-yard  (Read 758 times)
Palouse
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 71

Location: Pullman, WA


« on: July 24, 2013, 04:51:37 PM »

I've got two hives here in town, and city code dictates where I can place bee hives on my 1/4  acre lot; unfortunately, that's right on the property line with a neighbor who's allergic to bees. His wife disclosed that to me after I got my hives.

So far we've not had a problem, but as the season's worn on, there have been a couple of times the bees have gotten grumpy. I built a privacy fence for the bees to mitigate issues with that neighbor, but one sting, and the hives'll have to go. Ergo, I'm thinking ahead by finding an out-yard for my bees.

I know some of you have bees off site...how did you find them? Any tips for someone looking to relocate bees? Things to avoid?
Logged
D Semple
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 502

Location: Overland Park, Kansas


« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2013, 05:33:37 PM »

Getting permission is just a matter of knocking on enough doors, farmers generally like bees.

I look for:

Good forage
Close, to save on gas
Good forage
Not necessarily out of site, but out of site of the general public. If they are going to be visible to the public I like a house overlooking them.
Good access, I want to be able to drive right up to them
Water close by (and not pools)
Northwest wind break
Good forage
Gated access is nice

Don
Logged
JWChesnut
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 230

Location: Coastal Central California


« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2013, 07:51:56 PM »

A "craigslist" post and a notice board flyer at the feed store will generate more leads than you can deal with.
The hardest part is turning down an eager owner whose property is unsuitable.  You feel like you want to make them happy, but just have to say no.
Just like in retail or real estate: location, location and location.
Unless you are going to  be migratory, look for season long forage-- diversity, woodlots, hillslopes, creeks.
(for my yards> Arroyo Willow>Eucalyptus>White Sage>Wild Mustard>Toyon>Buckwheat>Coyote Bush  takes me from December to October without a nectar break.))
You want to have access that doesn't involve making an appointment.  I've tried yards where I have to call a day ahead, and it just doesn't work.
An owner with an interest in the bees and regular observation really helps -- if the bees swarm, or the hive goes wonky or a tree falls over -- its nice to have a pair of eyes.
It a great way to meet new friends.  Its definitely a relationship  that must be cultivated and developed, and because you are meeting over sweets and fruit of the land it can be really positive.

Everyone should have an out-yard, because manipulations are so much easier when you can change locations, etc.

The reasons yards don't work out are innumerable.  I set up in an Apple-Mandarine Orange-Avocado Orchard and thought I was golden, but the next spring the farmer said I had to move because, "the trees set too darn much fruit, and I spent my whole summer thinning".  Cannot win for losing.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2013, 08:19:02 PM by JWChesnut » Logged
sc-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1976


Location: Edgefield, SC


« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2013, 09:31:21 AM »

How close are you too folks that have a couple acres and plant a small home garden. Most small home gardeners are aware of pollination needs and the threat to  bees. I frequently have small gardeners ask me to set a couple hives up or how they can get bees of their own. Most when they find out the cost of setting up a couple hives ask next, " can you set a couple of yours on my garden."

As said above do you have a local feed and seed close by. If you do a couple inquiries will probably send you in the right direction grin I would say easy and unlimited access is the most important. Most all places have some kind of forage and often small neighborhoods are best due to ornamental shrubs etc. Water source of course, the pool thing, if one is close, becomes an immediate issue usually no matter how hard you try to prevent it. They love to hang out at the pool.

On a side note, your neighbor may be truly allergic, but I have found that a little swelling after a sting constitutes allergic to most folks that are scared of bees. But you are absolutely right it ain't worth the hassle if it happens. First yellow jacket that gets her, your bees get the blame Sad
Logged

John 3:16
Palouse
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 71

Location: Pullman, WA


« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2013, 12:53:37 PM »

Many thanks.

Adverstising online and at the local grange supply are great ideas.

Location will indeed be key, I think. I don't want to stray too far out of town because the Palouse is pretty arid in the summer with not a lot of forage, and the local farmers grow mainly wheat and barley; although, a lot of lentils, dried peas and garbanzos (all self-polinators) are grown, too, and some canola (just Google "Palouse", and you'll see what I mean), but mostly wheat and barley.

Logged
divemaster1963
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 591


Location: Gray, Ga. USA.

God Protect and watch over our sons and daughters.


« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2013, 10:50:42 PM »

Also check with your local plant and fruit tree dealers. I found a 15 ac. lot with friut trees and grapes. caught the owner out there one day andstopped and talked to him and he could not wait till I got them their. I now have 15 hives there and he wants more. just be sure to give them some of the fruits of both your labors so he can share with his family. Plus you get furits and wine if he does that too. (hickup) grin

John
Logged
Steel Tiger
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 537

Location: Southern New Hampshire


« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2013, 04:13:30 AM »

Along with everyone else's suggestions,  I would also push to get rid of that city code. At least try to get it changed.
Logged
Palouse
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 71

Location: Pullman, WA


« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2013, 11:38:57 AM »

Plus you get furits and wine if he does that too. (hickup) grin

John

Maybe I should move to Yakima and put my bees on hops...I'm not much of a wine drinker. 8^)  I wonder if the honey would taste like an IPA.


Along with everyone else's suggestions,  I would also push to get rid of that city code. At least try to get it changed.

I've given this some thought as I'd like to change the code for keeping chickens, too. Aside from lot size requirements, we're required to keep coops no closer than 20' from the property line, which puts the coop in the middle of my back yard.

I've an acquaintance who's kept bees for 15 years who lives ten miles from me in Moscow, ID, who obviously doesn't have the same codes I do in Pullman, WA. He's got a privacy fence, too, but his hives are maybe 15' from his neighbor's side door, which is frequently used. Nary a problem in all those years. He was actually the reason I felt comfortable putting my hives where they are, but reading all the posts here and elsewhere about grumpy bees stinging people while mowing and attacking people as they come through the back door make me nervous...not for me and mine so much as my neighbor. I do have to say, though, that the entrance to both of my hives is approx. 4' from my grass, and I run the mower right in front of both hives. I've never had a problem...so maybe I just shouldn't worry.
Logged
JWChesnut
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 230

Location: Coastal Central California


« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2013, 02:05:00 PM »

If you go to an out-yard, plan on including swarm traps as part of the set-up.  Out yards will have far more swarms than hives where you are observing daily.  I use nucboxes stacked two high as swarm traps with great success.  Place them on simple stands about 50 feet  from the main yard.

Logged
10framer
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1548

Location: Butler,GA


« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2013, 09:26:26 AM »

the county agent at your extension service knows a lot of land owners.  talk to him or her and i'm sure they'll ask around for you. 
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.259 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page November 19, 2014, 12:08:59 AM
anything