Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 18, 2014, 10:46:51 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1] 2 3  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Keep feeding 7 weeks old packages? HELP!!  (Read 2315 times)
TNBeeLady
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 66


Location: Woodbury, TN


« on: July 20, 2013, 09:51:58 AM »

I'm in middle TN & have 2 packages started June 1.  I have been feeding them with the understanding I would stop about 4-6 weeks after installing.  But they are still taking about a gallon a week in the top feeder.  The feeders were bone dry again today, but I took them off.  Did I do the right thing?  One hive has the 2nd brood box drawn 70% and the other has the 2nd brood box drawn 40-50%.  The queens are laying like crazy.
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2013, 09:54:31 AM »

.
That makes any sense.

How many frames of brood you have there?
Calculated as full frames?

Feeding whole summer?


If the queen really lays like grazy, they should have 2 boxes full of brood, about 16 frames.
.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
TNBeeLady
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 66


Location: Woodbury, TN


« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2013, 10:51:21 AM »

They have honey stored in the outside frames, and the frames with the brood also have some honey stores and pollen.  So I'm not sure of a percentage.  And I guess my definition of crazy is that they have all stages of laying going on, from eggs to bees hatching, with brood frames that are being laid compactly.  And everytime I check, they are still drawing out new frames.
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2013, 01:03:23 PM »

They have honey stored in the outside frames, and the frames with the brood also have some honey stores and pollen.  So I'm not sure of a percentage.  And I guess my definition of crazy is that they have all stages of laying going on, from eggs to bees hatching, with brood frames that are being laid compactly.  And everytime I check, they are still drawing out new frames.

I know very well what they do. I have had bees 50 years and I have feeded them that they make combs with sugar. But I have feeded swarms only one week, not more.
I know too, how to make maximun amount of brood to the hive. Sugar only spoils the maximum production.

I have had not such hive, which cannot do new combs when needed. They allways do them.
Making new combs is not the goal in beekeeping. It is first goal is to get much brood, then becomes much bees and bees make much honey.  

Our summer is very short to make operations.  Yield period is only 2 months.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2013, 01:07:20 PM »

They have honey stored in the outside frames, and the frames with the brood also have some honey stores and pollen.  So I'm not sure of a percentage.  And I guess my definition of crazy is that they have all stages of laying going on, from eggs to bees hatching, with brood frames that are being laid compactly.  And everytime I check, they are still drawing out new frames.

Yes, so they do. But stop feeding now and look what they get from nature. Take full food frames off from hive.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
10framer
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1570

Location: Butler,GA


« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2013, 01:36:28 PM »

welcome to beekeeping and the forum.  you wouldn't know it but everyone doesn't choose to berate new members for asking questions.
pull the feed for now and see what the bees do.  my bees haven't been productive since late may.  i'm hoping for a decent late summer/fall flow but not counting on it.
if you find that the bees have made no progress in a couple of weeks and that the stores are lower than they are now you may want to put the feed back on them.  i'm in middle georgia and i don't know how our flows compare to middle tn, but the best of it is behind us down here.
i don't feed much but starting from packages as late as june first i can see where you might need to. your goal for this year is to get the bees through winter. 
good luck and have fun.
Logged
TNBeeLady
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 66


Location: Woodbury, TN


« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2013, 08:24:03 AM »

Thank you 10framer for understanding my question.  Since June is 2 months later than the normal to start a package here, I was just wondering because everything I read says feed new packages for the first few weeks, and they will stop taking it on their own.   But they aren't stopping.  I will try what you suggested and keep an eye on their stores.  Thank you again!
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2013, 09:27:51 AM »

 But they aren't stopping. 

Then you must continue feeding if you do not know how to stop it.

Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
GSF
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1938

Location: Central AL (nw corner of Elmore County)


« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2013, 07:27:14 PM »

 

 But they aren't stopping.  

Then you must continue feeding if you do not know how to stop it.


lau

Where would we be without Mr F.?

Welcome TNBeeLady! I too am very new to beekeeping as well. There's plenty of good folks on here who can help.
Logged

"Life is hard, It's even harder when you're stupid."

John Wayne
sc-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1986


Location: Edgefield, SC


« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2013, 09:29:12 PM »

Welcome Tnbeelady - some folks don't belive in feeding as I think you see. Some folks you have to just..... weeellllll  Lips Sealed

You will get several different scenerios and answers to the same question. Evalaute and do what works for you. It is important to look at the style of beekeeping you want and does the posters style fit yours. Loacl is important. I won't keep my bees her in the south as someone would in say Mi. Some things are similar some are totally different.

Now 10 framer give you some valid point and good info. On the other hand if my bees were drawing comb, you ahd no natural flow and I could afford to feed them, I would until the second boxes were drawn out. My flow is over and I have problems getting bees to build comb after the flow is over. They just pack the sugar in empty space.  With that said NO they will not stop when they no longer need it. They will keep taking it in, store it in the brood chambers and the queen can become honey bound with no place to lay which can lead to swarming.

But you said they are still drawing frames and the queen has plenty brood space drawn out to lay- -- correct? That is the important part do not overfeed where there is no space for the queen to lay.
Logged

John 3:16
sterling
Queen Bee
****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 1062

Location: mt juliet tn


« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2013, 09:48:00 PM »

They will stop drawing comb and slow down brood rearing without some feed. We are not in a dearth but unless you are near cotton or some other type of crop  there is not enough nectar comming for them to build up a lot. They will probably get by OK just will not expand much. We are in middle Tn not Finland.
Logged
Farm 779
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15

Location: Lazy Mountain, Alaska

My bees can 'hold it' !


« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2013, 10:20:02 PM »

What may be missing, is to check your pollen intake. I feed my bees like crazy, gallons per 6-9 days until the pollen begins to be consistent flowing (with caveats such as splits). I also check color for which type of fauna the pollen is coming from.

I use pollen intake as a predictor if I require hive supplements.
Logged

Farm 779
Lazy Mountain, Alaska
sc-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1986


Location: Edgefield, SC


« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2013, 10:39:22 PM »

We are in middle Tn not Finland.

 Jerry

Another locale thing. Do you get a fall flow? I don't so I really don't care to feed to stimulate for growth if I already have enough bees to winter and enogh feed to get them through. This may be controversial to some.  I care not to make extra bees to through the winter. For nothern climates needing bees for warmth or if you have a fall flow coming your needs may be different.

Of course for me I try and make it a no brainer after establishment and let them have what they want. Their own honey grin
Logged

John 3:16
TNBeeLady
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 66


Location: Woodbury, TN


« Reply #13 on: July 21, 2013, 11:08:55 PM »

As a new beekeeper, I'm trying to learn.  I don't mean to ask stupid questions.  Anyway...I feel better after reading the last few answers.  Once again, I appreciate 10framers advice.  And thanks for the encouragement, GSF!  And sc-bee, yes they are still drawing comb out in the 2nd boxes & the queens do still have room to lay.  I think there's goldenrod around here in the fall, but I don't know about anything else.   And sterling, I appreciate hearing from someone in middle TN as I'm not familiar with the way the nectar flow goes yet, but I'm trying to learn.  There are no crops to speak of close by that I'm aware of- I'm in a very hilly forest area.  Is there a fall flow in our area?   And Farm 779, they seem to be bringing in quite a bit of pollen right now, from what I don't know though.  Thanks again everyone for the help.  I feel I have gained a lot by the answers you've given me  Smiley
Logged
sc-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1986


Location: Edgefield, SC


« Reply #14 on: July 22, 2013, 12:06:48 AM »

Your question was not stupid by any means. Some of your answers were ........... rude as usual. Unfortunately it's like a day care around here sometimes and some folks you have to learn to ignore grin Ask away and learn, most encourage it th_thumbsupup
Logged

John 3:16
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4486

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #15 on: July 22, 2013, 01:32:30 AM »

The feeding debates are pretty mild compared to the wintering debates. laugh

I lived in Memphis for a time and it normally gets pretty dry down there in the summer.  It is much different (and cooler) at the Northern latitudes.  As SC bee says, you do need to take local conditions into account so local advice may be a better source to listen to.  I never feed in the summer up here because there is almost always plenty for the bees due to our cooler, wetter climate.  Down there, as long as you’re not promoting robbing and you’re not getting honey bound, maybe some feeding is ok for a package.   

Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2013, 01:42:58 AM »

What may be missing, is to check your pollen intake. I feed my bees like crazy, gallons per 6-9 days until the pollen begins to be consistent flowing (with caveats such as splits). I also check color for which type of fauna the pollen is coming from.

I use pollen intake as a predictor if I require hive supplements.

Finland and Alaska are at same level.

I extract honey like grazy, and you feed hives like grazy. It is July now. That it the difference when you laugh there  in Great America.

(Small point. Pollen comes from flora, not from fauna.)

Bluebee feeds bees along winter like grazy. We do then nothing to hives.
.

You speak about local, but mostly Florida and Alaska are the same porriage in your speaks.


What we have common: in every country beekeepers are as grazy.
.
.

Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4486

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #17 on: July 22, 2013, 01:46:12 AM »

Bluebee feeds bees along winter like grazy. We do then nothing to hives.
Especially on the holidays  grin

There isn't much nectar in Michigan after the snow flies  angel
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2013, 02:17:23 AM »

.
You love to laugh (with) me. I give to you a good reason to laugh.

When I put my hive on balance, it had allready 50 kg honey and after that it has brought 80 kg honey in one month.

Lets continue. Me Finland, me much mites.

http://koti.tnnet.fi/web144/vaakapesa/selaa.php?vuosi=2013&kunta=112

The brown figure tells what hive brought when it was in false swarm state. I gove to it 3 medium boxes foundations to stop swarming fever. Then I joined swarm hive and brood hive.

.

Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #19 on: July 22, 2013, 03:10:29 AM »

.
And if you look my writings, I have never asked help from American beekeepers.
That is the laughable difference.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Pages: [1] 2 3  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.42 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page December 17, 2014, 08:55:42 AM
anything