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Author Topic: cut out with pics  (Read 314 times)
dfizer
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« on: July 11, 2013, 09:23:25 PM »

I have an question to pose and hopefully there's a simple solution -

As part of my cut out I opened up a window (was boarded on both sides) that had bees in it.  I thought it would be an easy cut out.  After removing the outside board I was surprised to find comb that was nearly 30 inches long.  I almost crapped my knickers.  See pics - Given the size of this comb and that I was running out of time I decided to board it back up and come back with the right amount of empty frames. 

The conundrum I have is that it's hotter than blue blazes here and I'm afraid that if I cut the comb at the top and try to lay it down in one piece I'll break it or smash it or damage it in some way.  It seems very soft.  I don't want to render it unusable.  Should I start cutting strips off the bottom and put them in the frames and simply work my way up cutting off one frames worth of comb at a time or how should I handle such large comb?  I really don't want to damage it.




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Please let me know your thoughts soon as I need to head back over there tomorrow am to finish this up. 

David

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iddee
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« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2013, 09:39:45 PM »

I cut sections from the bottom as I go. I ONLY install brood comb into the new hive. Installing empty comb, pollen comb, or honey comb in the hive is a guaranteed disaster. The SHB will destroy the hive within a week.
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dfizer
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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2013, 10:37:44 PM »

I think I'll crush and strain the capped honey comb however im not sure what to do with the uncapped honey, empty and pollen comb.  I'll install the brood comb into a weak hive I have in my apiary.  Great suggestion!  I believe this is the best solution. 

Thanks iddee!  Gread iddeea!

Lol

David 
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nietssemaj
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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2013, 10:42:23 PM »

I'd crush and strain the uncapped stuff as well. Just separately and feed that back to the bees.
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Moots
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« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2013, 06:30:19 AM »

...Should I start cutting strips off the bottom and put them in the frames and simply work my way up cutting off one frames worth of comb at a time...


David,
Schawee had JP make a guest appearance at our LBC meeting this past Tuesday.  Your description above is exactly how he suggested handling large comb.  He explained that you can use smoke to move them up the comb and out of the way as you work your way up.

Good luck...let us know how it turns out.  Smiley
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