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Author Topic: Building the Coates Nuc  (Read 675 times)
KD4MOJ
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« on: July 08, 2013, 07:07:47 AM »

Ok I知 not a carpenter. I知 a computer tech, software developer for local govt.. I have rudimentary skills working with wood.

That being said, I知 going to attempt to build the D.Coates nucs since I知 out of hardware and need to do some splits. What method are folks using to construct these nucs, specifically cutting the wood? Are you using a circular saw or table saw etc.? I知 thinking about getting the 4x8痴 cut in half so I can use the circular saw that I have.

Any suggestions or recommendations (tips?) ?

DOUG
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bud1
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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2013, 07:47:39 AM »

i use a table say
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RC
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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2013, 09:52:06 AM »

I use a circular saw. I clamp a straight edge to the plywood, I can't cut straight any other way.
I don't make the cutout for the entrance like the plans show, I just cut off a corner of the front piece. Works fine.
I also cut a extra 2" strip for the top of the long sides to help with warping and adjust the top to cover these.
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gailmo
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« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2013, 10:21:56 AM »

I also use a circular saw and like the person posting above, I clamp on a board as a straight-edge guide.  I also cut the plywood on the floor--using some foam core board as a buffer between the cement floor and the board.  Doing this keeps the pieces from crimping together.  For me, it is easy and fast.

Another thing I do when making these nukes-- I use screws instead of nails.  This way I can quickly unscrew the bottoms and stack them on top of each other if the nuk is doing well and needs more space.  I just stick a piece of wood in the entrance of the upper nuk and slap some duck tape over it.  A good drill/impact driver is worth its weight in gold when making these.  I had a cheap Harbor Freight drill and junked it for a good 18volt lithium-ion model.  Best purchase I have made this year!

Since I use mediums, I make the 8 frame nuks (plans are somewhere online--along with a cut sheet for the plywood.   I cut opposing "doors" in each end --this way I can stick in a follower board and divide the nuk into two if I want to start a couple of queens.  If not, I just shut off one end and use it as an 8 frame nuk. 
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KD4MOJ
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« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2013, 10:47:31 AM »

Thanks for the good tips. Gives me some ideas. I like the clamp idea.. hadn't thought of that. I'll probably do that since I can't cut straight either!~

I was wondering how to make that entrance cut. I may have to just use a 1" wood bit instead of the rectangular entrance.

...DOUG
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2013, 11:03:58 AM »

You can use your circular saw to make the opening by cutting the 2 sides of the opening and then make numerous cuts in between to remove the rest of the wood. Stack up 3 of them together and it will  done quickly.
Jim
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RC
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« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2013, 01:28:58 PM »

Just move the entrance to the side of the board instead of the middle and it'll be easy. Only takes two cuts.
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KD4MOJ
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« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2013, 02:10:16 PM »

WOW...  everyone has a good way of doing something. Help's woodworking idiots like me!  grin

...DOUG
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JWChesnut
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« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2013, 03:08:17 PM »

I make nearly the same design, with this modification---
***I build the end pieces out of standard 8" (net 7 1/2") fenceboard.****

The sides are ply, but building the ends out of fenceboard speeds and simplifies the design.

The end boards are solid, so running a drywall screw or nail to fasten has great holding power.  (Nailing to end grain ply is poor practice)

The fence boards are already cut to 7 1/2" width so you don't have to rip to width.  Fenceboards are typically  5/8 net thickness, so the length of the sides  needs a slight adjustment  to maintain bee space. I use 19 7/8" (as standard size) -- this is over bee space by 1/16" but doesn't seem to matter. and makes the components compatible with standard hives.

Tops, bottoms and sides are typically longer rips on the sheet material. 
I make tops and bottoms identical -- and drill a cork hole as the entrance in the endboard.  The hole is slightly off center (so the opening lines up with the frame gap just below the shoulder of the frames).

Sometimes, I make tops, bottoms and sides same depth (9 3/4")-- this has the advantage of simplification.  Tops and bottoms overhang, but I knife notch to receive a line that I use to bind the nuc together.  I don't usually nail tops on except for long distance moves.  I make the sides out of any sheet good I can scrounge, and the oversize top and bottoms mean that 3/4' material works for sides just as well as thinner stock.  All parts are interchangeable.  In a pinch, tops and bottoms can be temporarily substituted for sides.

Weakness of using fenceboards is some species (uncured, treated  pine especially) will cup.  Western cedar/redwood are very stable.
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