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Author Topic: Would a fruit fly trap used for SHB be good near a hive?  (Read 853 times)
ChrisT
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« on: July 04, 2013, 02:52:54 PM »

You can catch fruit flys in your house with a paper funnel resting in the mouth of a jar with apple cider vinegar in the jar at a level to almost meet the hanging funnel. The fruit flies go in and die in the vinegr bc they cant get out.

So, If I was to make such a contraption and place it next to the hive, I am sure it would catch SHB but would it actually DRAW more SHB since its sitting ouside the hive in the open?

I had a bad beetle problem last year so I moved my hive to an 20x15 concrete pad this year and I still have lots of SHB. The hive gets sun from 10am on. I cant see the beetles leave during the day but at night near closing time (last call), they come flying into in the hive in a regular stream. I assume they are escaping the heat of the hive during the day.

Anyways, I thought I could put that fruit fly idea out by the hive and see what i catch. At worst case scenario, I could just put it out during last call and bring it in afterwards so it doesnt stay out there all the time.

I put my hive on a concrete pad too bc I thought that without dirt there would be less. I know they can travel long distances but I have just as many SHB as when they were over dirt so dirt definitely doesnt increase chances of having SHB.

I just wanted to see if anyone else had tried the fruit fly trap idea already and if it attracted even more SHB

Thanks
Chris

 
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2013, 07:10:32 PM »

Chris,
Why not put the trap away from your hive. The SHB are attracted to the smell of the hive from miles away.
I recommend you get a screen bottom board with an oil trap.
My first couple of years, the SHB,s were horrible. They slimed my first hive, defective queen. Right then I started surfing for all of the ways to get rid of them and I found the SBB and a Screen Top Board worked the best to destroy them by the thousands/hive. Those first 2 years I had to keep the oil trays well oiled and had to empty them at least once a month and in thirty days time the trays were a solid black mass of SHB. The STB's also helped, I would check them every night and kill all of the ones trapped on top of the screen.
Now I just leave the trays dry because the beetle numbers are so low it is not worthy all of the trouble cleaning and refilling them. I just pull out the trays and kill the few that are in them. Just have to check on them once a month to kill the worms that get kicked out of the hives and are developing on the pollen that collects in it.
Don't use them dry until you get the local population down to few SHB per hive.
I just pulled 42 gallons of honey from my hives and only found 4 beetles in all of the hives.
Jim
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sc-bee
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« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2013, 07:39:54 PM »

I am sure it would catch SHB but would it actually DRAW more SHB since its sitting ouside the hive in the open?

I put my hive on a concrete pad too bc I thought that without dirt there would be less. I know they can travel long distances but I have just as many SHB as when they were over dirt so dirt definitely doesnt increase chances of having SHB.


I don't think it will work but give it a try and let us know. A wax moth trap out of a two liter bottle is similar and it don't catch shb.

Yes, dirt or type and content definitely increases the chance of shb in some areas. It is usually too late for a hive after you have to worry about the dirt deal but as long range issue it can make a difference. The larvae hatch and leave the hive and bore into the ground to pupate. Some say they can also pupate in the hive. The concreate if hot would surely slow this down if your hives got to this stage. Usually too late by then however.
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John 3:16
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« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2013, 07:59:27 PM »

Like sawdust maker I had severe SHB problems until I got my first IPK beetle trap from green beehives. Shortly after all my hives had one. I change the oil spring and fall. I'm not sure I've seen a live beetle this year.
When they fly in they fall right thru the screen.
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nietssemaj
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« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2013, 07:52:29 AM »

Last year I made beetle lures and put then under my hives.  The lures caught lots of beetles.  My hives caught more.  I lost the whole apiary (5 hives by summer)  to beetles by August. I also had between frame traps and oil trays I several of the hives.


I have no scientific proof as I only had 1 apiary but so far this year with no lures I seem to have fewer beetles. 
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ChrisT
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« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2013, 11:50:58 AM »

Thanks for the replys.

I guess as nietssema said, the traps [near the hive] caused a bigger problem.

Wolfer, what is an "IPK" beetle trap?

sawdustmakr, I will try putting it in front of my house and see what happens. I know people have success with screen bottom boards and oil traps but what is a screened top board?

I have used the beetle jails but they generally only catch a handful before they dry out in the heat here. I would have to fill them every few days and opening the hive up that much seems intrusive.

Thanks for helping

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ChrisT
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« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2013, 12:31:34 PM »

Ok so i found out what an IPK is, a fancy name for a screened bottom board oil trap.

I found Wolfers suggestion at greenbeehives.com
It looks promising and better and easier to use than the west traps (my bees dont like me pulling stuff out the front of the hive either)
I will try that and see how it goes.

Still not sure what a screened top board is as nobody seems to sell such a thing

Thanks again

Chris
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GSF
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« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2013, 05:59:18 PM »

Warning Rookie advice!

Chris, I don't know what it is but I could imagine it being something like/or a screen bottom board used on top. Ain't figured out what for tho.
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"Life is hard, It's even harder when you're stupid."

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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2013, 11:11:50 PM »

It is a piece of wood the same size of a super, 1 1/2" high with a piece of window screen stapled on the bottom and a 3/8" by 3/4" strips of wood on top of the screen. I put 1/8" slots to allow ventalation and the beetles to get on top of it. It replaces the inner cover. I check on it regularly and kill the beetles and the bees with out bothering them.
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sc-bee
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« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2013, 11:26:05 PM »

It is a piece of wood the same size of a super, 1 1/2" high with a piece of window screen stapled on the bottom and a 3/8" by 3/4" strips of wood on top of the screen. I put 1/8" slots to allow ventalation and the beetles to get on top of it. It replaces the inner cover. I check on it regularly and kill the beetles and the bees with out bothering them.

Need a picture  grin
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John 3:16
ChrisT
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« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2013, 12:25:00 AM »

sawdstmakr,

RE: the screened top board

If there is window screening on the bottom, how do the beetles get thru?
I imagine your description of 1 1/2 inches high is the perimeter frame of this screen top board (with the window screening stapled below) and then 3/8 x 3/4 inch strips of wood placed in parallel and being spaced 1/8 inches apart?
So its almost like a louvre (shutter) except that theyre not slanted?

Still i couldnt imagine how the beetles would get thru the screen unless you meant you cut 1/8 inch slits into the screen?
And you said you make these slits to allow for ventilation. Wouldnt the screen itself allow for ventilation?
You description is very much appreciated but was a little confusing.

Anyone have a picture or a link to one being sold?

Thanks

Chris


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ChrisT
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« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2013, 12:53:16 AM »

I have found another post from sawdstmakr that expalined the screen top board construction better:

Here it is reprinted (hopefully sawdstmakr wont mind)

Take a 3/4" x 2' board and cut and glue it together to be the size of your box or use an old super and cut it into 2" deep sections. Using a table saw, cut a 1/8" slot 3/4" from the top about 10" long in the middle of each side. This is for ventilation and to allow the beetles to get in above the screen. Staple a piece of screen on the bottom of this frame. Then cut 3/4" x 3/4 piece of wood cut to the size of frame and nail it over the top of the screen. Be sure it seal it to keep bugs out below the screen.

...lift the lid every day and kill the beetles that are above the screen

Thanks for explanation sawdstmakr
But just to clarify: The idea of this is to get the beetles to enter the top in the 1/8 inch slits (which are 10 inches long) and not be able to go down into the hive (becuase of the window screen blocking them) right? So they just kinda gather there on top of the screen with nowhere to go? And these "slits" could just as well be 1/8 inch holes at intervals (they dont have to actually be a continuous slit)?

Chris

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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2013, 01:13:10 AM »

Take a old super and cut off a 1 1/2" section on a table saw, all the way around. You now have a 1 1/2" tall mini super. Set your table saw fence for a 3/4" gap. Using the table saw, push the mini super down onto the blade in the middle of each side to cut a 1/8" vent slot about 6" long. Then staple the screen over one side. Then nail 3/8" x 3/4" pieces of wood over the screen to give a little space over the frames. Be sure these boards fit tightly to seal out any bugs between the top super and the screen. When you place the cover over this screen top board the beetles are able to crawl into the slot that you cut through the middle of the sides of the boards. This allows them to get on top of the screen but they cannot get in the hive. They like this entrance because they can smell the air from the hive flowing up through the hive, through the screen and out of the slots. Quite often I find dead SHBs dead on top of the screen. I also check my hives by lifting the cover and I kill the SHBs that are on the screen. Do not use #8 wire cloth instead of the screen because you will give the SHBs free access to your hive.
I hope this helps
Jim
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2013, 01:26:42 AM »

Thanks Chris for adding the original post while i was typing the last post. I am not a fast typest, especially on this Iphone. I have since started making them shorter, 1 1/2" and found they work just as we'll.
Jim
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