Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 20, 2014, 02:52:57 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Hive split  (Read 445 times)
colbees
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 84

Location: Amsterdam, New York


« on: June 26, 2013, 09:33:47 PM »

Hi everyone I am wondering if it is too late to do a hive split, and if I could still get honey if I split now. I have an 8 frame hive with deeps and I want to put some of the frames from this hive into a 10 frame  hive with deeps will this work? any other information on splits will be greatly appreciated, Thanks
Logged

A swarm of bees in May is worth a load of hay; A swarm of bees in June is worth a silver spoon; A swarm of bees in July isn't worth a fly.
don2
Doak
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 350

Location: Hillsboro Georgia USA


« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2013, 10:00:50 PM »

Deep will do O.K. You will have about 1/3 more bees per frame than mediums. It is not too late but don't know getting any honey. It will depend on what kind of flow you have later on. You may get some from the mother hive.  Smiley d2
Logged

JWChesnut
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 228

Location: Coastal Central California


« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2013, 10:19:59 PM »

On July 1st, it is better to split and requeen with a purchased queen, than to expect the split to make an emergency queen.

 With an emergency queen you have 26+ days post-split before it is realistic to have the first newly laid brood.  You need another 22 days (now 48 day in total at minimum) before you have the first new hatching worker.  Your hive will be at the end of August before it leaves survival mode and begins building,  that is too late for any meaningful increase.  Its population will have dropped throughout July and August as workers expire.  It will be weak and dispirited - hardly a booming new colony preparing for winter.

Spliting will weaken the donor hive (you didn't say how big it is).  The newly constituted colony will be sub-standard for winter survival.  I assume your bees will enter winter mode in October.  You likely only have 45 days (2 additional cohorts of brood) after the split gets on its feet at the end of August.  It is going to be tiny and weak.

Beeks with access to multiple hives feed weak splits frames of capped brood weekly during the emergency queen cycle, sounds like you only have one hive, and so don't really have the resources to parasitize from elsewhere to artificially bolster the emergency split. 

The short answer -- purchase a queen or plan better next year.
Logged
sc-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1699


Location: Edgefield, SC


« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2013, 10:27:00 PM »

8 frame hive with deeps. One box, two, three, four? I see a Ga. and a Ca. answer. I am curious also. Waiting for a regional answer.
Logged

John 3:16
Bees In Miami
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 169

Location: Davie, Florida


« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2013, 12:10:48 AM »

colbees...Is this your first year?  How many boxes do you have now, brood, and how much honey have they stored for over wintering?   You can certainly transfer them to 10 framers...just curious what you have for resources before talking about splitting. 
Logged
Oblio13
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 214

Location: Central New Hampshire


WWW
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2013, 07:43:30 AM »

I think summer splits made in June and July is the direction northern beekeeping is taking. If you're planning to overwinter them as nucs, this might be a good time to let splits requeen themselves. The break in the brood cycle will beat down the Varroa, there are plenty of drones flying, and the nucs will go into winter with young queens and bees. You have August and September to feed them until they're full.
Logged
colbees
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 84

Location: Amsterdam, New York


« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2013, 12:15:50 PM »

the hive I will be splitting from has two full brood chambers and it also has a super on it my bees died over the winter and I got a new set in mid april, they just had to fill the comb with honey. I also have a 10 frame that was also started this spring but I cant  split because population and honey production isn't very good yet.
Logged

A swarm of bees in May is worth a load of hay; A swarm of bees in June is worth a silver spoon; A swarm of bees in July isn't worth a fly.
JWChesnut
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 228

Location: Coastal Central California


« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2013, 01:01:25 PM »

No compelling reason for a split expressed in your post.  Your big hive has a max of 10-11 frames of brood, and minimal stores. Your small hive is described as weak.  First management task: exchange locations to equalize the two hive population.  This will take any crowding pressure off the larger hive and allow the smaller hive to build to winter strength and stores.

In effect you already have a "split" in the small hive, your task now is to use management to build that one up.
Logged
colbees
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 84

Location: Amsterdam, New York


« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2013, 02:24:32 PM »

im not splitting because of a high bee population im wondering if I would be able to split so that I can start a new hive, if I buy a new queen
Logged

A swarm of bees in May is worth a load of hay; A swarm of bees in June is worth a silver spoon; A swarm of bees in July isn't worth a fly.
JWChesnut
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 228

Location: Coastal Central California


« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2013, 02:50:28 PM »

I cannot tell you how to winter manage your hives. I am in temperate coastal California. Even in my mild climate, going into winter with marginal colonies will result in unnecessary losses.  Build up your weak hive to what is considered winter-thrifty for your area, and that means equalize your two existing colonies.

Making splits has an element of art and craft knowledge, knowing how far you can push the bees and when.  Beekeeping is a long-term process, and it appears you are trying to "put the cart before the horse". 

  Learn how to keep bee over-winter, and when you have successfully mastered that skill (and it appears you haven't yet), then it is appropriate to learn the arcane skills of making increase.  Start with the easy divides: new hives with purchased queens at the peak of spring increase next May (last week of April in my mild location).  Master that skill, and then move on the difficult and fraught process of doing emergency splits in the summer.

Logged
dfizer
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 271

Location: Ballston Spa, New York


« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2013, 10:29:39 PM »

I am located very close to you and my girlfriends house and hive is literally in Amsterdam.  She lives down near LaCucina on the south side of Amsterdam. 

To answer your question about splitting this time of year... yes you can do it.  I split the hive at my girls house last July and it made it through the winter just fine.  I made sure they were mite free and had plenty of food going into the winter and they came through very strong. 

Should you need any assistance jlmk.  I am in Amsterdam 4-5 time a week. 

David
Logged
dfizer
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 271

Location: Ballston Spa, New York


« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2013, 10:41:42 PM »

im not splitting because of a high bee population im wondering if I would be able to split so that I can start a new hive, if I buy a new queen

Betterbee in Greenwich has queens for around $30 - I have 3 of them in hives now and they are very good producers.  They are Carns.

David
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.137 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page April 19, 2014, 06:10:41 AM
anything