Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 29, 2014, 06:08:04 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Ant proof hive stand  (Read 1868 times)
ozebee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 105

Location: Sydney, Australia


« on: June 24, 2013, 10:24:07 PM »

I had several hives sitting on normal pallets at a bush property. To my surprise, the pallets were quickly demolished by termites and even one of the  bottom boards in a hive was virtually totally eaten. I only noticed it when I was cleaning it and my hive tool just went right through!

Well, that got me thinking on a stand which would prevent such a problem. Attached are a couple of photos of a very simple to make stand, which uses post stands concreted into cement blocks with space left on top for filling with oil (or similar liquid) which will provide a barrier against any crawly insects such as ants and termites.






The space at the ends and in the middle is such that when inspecting the hives, individual frames can be dropped in a rested or else complete boxes can be rested.
Logged
Anybrew
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 223


Location: Dubbo Australia


« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2013, 02:10:38 AM »

I like that cool
Logged
squidink
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 165


Location: Melbourne


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2013, 06:27:50 PM »

Looks great mate! That will stop the termites getting to the hives! Plus will be better for your back too.
Ben
Logged

CJ
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 59

Location: NSW Australia


« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2013, 06:57:39 PM »

Looks great!
Logged
ziffabeek
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 381

Location: Atlanta


« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2013, 09:12:37 AM »

I love this!! I sent the link to my husband.  I hate those pesky ants under the top cover!

Now to begin the work of convincing him to build it!! Smiley

Thanks for the post and the idea!

love,
ziffa
Logged
Lone
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1053


Location: North Queensland


« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2013, 09:14:42 AM »

Hello Ozebee,

It looks really good. 

A few minor points..

If the grass grows up, the black ants can climb onto the stand. They generally are not much of a problem, though some varieties, such as meat ants, can bother bee hives.  You'd have to visit the site fairly regularly or put something down to suppress the grass.

If cane toads decide they like the Sydney clime, your bees will all be gobbled up at that height.  Hopefully the few you have there will move back to Queensland, because we don't like anyone taking our cane toads.

Some white ants will build mounds that reach up to what they eat.  It happened in the saddle shed here and though the horse ropes were hanging off the ground, they built a mound and ate the good ropes.

We have special wildlife in QLD.

Lone
Logged
ozebee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 105

Location: Sydney, Australia


« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2013, 02:38:36 AM »

Thanks for your valuable comments Lone.

I hope to be visiting the site often enough to keep the grass down and kick down any attempts by termites to build a mound up to the timber!
I guess the first year will show how successful this design is but I am sure it will be better than the 4 timber pallets that barely lasted a year!
Lets hope the cane toads find Sydney too cold to venture down to......
Logged
Better.to.Bee.than.not
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 465

Location: S-E Michigan


« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2013, 04:25:16 AM »

you could use something to block the rain from washing into the oil pit probably. otherwise not bad, hope it works out well for you.
Logged
Lone
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1053


Location: North Queensland


« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2013, 09:41:53 AM »

By the way,(on a different topic) stay on topic the fellas used half sized blocks with concrete up to about the same level to keep the new extractor up at the right height to fit the 20 litre drum under, and which also can be filled with an ant barrier in case we leave the extractor for a while for smoko or something like that. It's real stable. It sounds like you think of the same things.

Quote
Lets hope the cane toads find Sydney too cold to venture down to......

 I seem to recall it was you lot had the 47 degree day not too long back.

Quote
you could use something to block the rain from washing into the oil pit probably. otherwise not bad, hope it works out well for you.

We tend to put covers over the front oil cans because there are always a lot of dead bees in there.  Maybe someone can answer this, whether it's bees who go there to die at the end of their days, or if it's more likely they veer too close and accidently drown?

Lone
Logged
Inquorate
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 20

Location: Sydney, Australia

Beeginner


« Reply #9 on: September 28, 2013, 06:29:21 PM »

A good clue would be the state of their wings; frayed means they were on their last days.
Logged

"People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it." - George Bernard Shaw
sawdstmakr
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2625


Location: Jacksonville FL


« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2013, 12:27:00 AM »

Usually it is bees bearding , especially at night.
Jim
Logged
Meadlover
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 216

Location: Gold Coast Hinterland, QLD, Australia


« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2013, 05:56:57 PM »

Very nice design. Great work.

I agree with other comments to cover the oil to prevent the oil washing out during heavy rain.
Another option would be to smear grease on the legs - it stands up better to rain and wont wash off as easy.
Logged
Lone
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1053


Location: North Queensland


« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2013, 09:20:40 PM »

I just bought a tube of Tree Tanglefoot from Green Harvest for my stingless bee hive.  It stays on longer than grease or vaseline, and doesn't get runny on a hot day.
Logged
ozebee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 105

Location: Sydney, Australia


« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2013, 09:22:12 PM »

Good idea about the grease!!  I have found that the oil disappears too quickly - either rain or actually seeps through the cement blocks. Probably they  need to be sealed properly.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.266 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 27, 2014, 07:10:33 AM