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Author Topic: Adding boxes  (Read 295 times)
Steel Tiger
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« on: June 24, 2013, 06:04:04 PM »

  I have two hives started from nucs almost 2 months ago. Each has one deep which is mostly bood and a few honey frames. I added mediums at the same time, even though 1 hive was building faster than the other. The faster of the two quickly built comb in the medium, so I added another 3 weeks later, which was about 3 weeks ago. I've pulled a few frames from that hive and added it to the weaker hive to get them a tiny kick start on their medium. I did an inspection just under a week ago and both hives were doing well.
 I went in today and decided that both hives need another box.
 The weaker hive had only 1 frame untouched. The other 9 frames were full or nearly full and packed with capped and uncapped honey, no brood at all.
 The other hive, the bottom medium had fully draw comb on all frames and all frames was full of mostly capped honey. The medium above had 2 untouched frames and comb being built on the other 8. Five of the frames was almost completely built out. I straightened two combs that were being built funny and put the two empty frames between built out frames. All frames that has comb also has honey.
 I'm planning on adding the new mediums by Saturday. As it looks right now, the queens may be honey bound. My plan is to either put the two new mediums under the deep along with 2 frames of honey on the ends or place them on top of the deep with 2 frames of honey. I'm leaning more towards putting them under the deep and hope the queen heads down.
 A third option I just thought of is adding a medium under the deep and added one on top as well. This should give the queen space under her to lay while giving them more room for honey, which is coming in fast.
 I was also thinking of removing frames of capped honey, freezing them, putting them in those freezer bags that you can suck all the air out of and seal them...then keeping them in a safe cool place in case I need to feed the bees next winter.
 Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated
 
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Joe D
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« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2013, 08:29:16 PM »

It does sound like they do need more room, so add another super.  I would put it on top, would take off extra capped supers, would leave one on top of deep and then the new super.  They should make room for the queen to lay.  Wouldn't want to make to much for them to have to defend.  Some places are having a good year, some are here, some aren't.  With the weather and etc this has been my worst year.  Anyway, the little honey I have this year I have put the super in a 55 gal sealed thrash bag and freeze for a few days.  Then I take it out put that bag into another sealed bag, double bagging, and put it up for the bees latter.  Good luck to you and your bees.



Joe
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tjc1
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« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2013, 09:48:38 PM »

How does it help to freeze the honey for a few days and then take it out again for storage?
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Finski
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« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2013, 10:17:49 PM »

.
It seems good that you follow the build up and add boxes.
Colonies are different in they habits and build up.
Carry on.
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Steel Tiger
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« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2013, 10:22:08 PM »

How does it help to freeze the honey for a few days and then take it out again for storage?
freezing kills eggs and larva of small hive beetles and wax moths.  The last thing you want is to pull a frame out of the hive and store it in what you think is a safe place and go to use it a few months later and find it destroyed. I'll be keeping the frames in the house and from what I've heard, you do NOT want a wax moth infestation inside your home. That was from someone who experienced it years ago and is still finding moths.
 It's a good practice to freeze any comb that you plan on saving for future use whether it has honey in it or not. A day or two in the freezer and then bag it...or, as Joe D said... double bag it. I personally have enough room in my freezer to store 25-30 medium frames of honey. I don't know if honey can get frost burn so after letting it freeze solid, I'll vacuum wrap it and them either keep it in the freezer or save them in a plastic stage container with a top.
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