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Author Topic: cold winter this year?  (Read 566 times)
10framer
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« on: June 24, 2013, 09:08:34 AM »

it's a long way off but i'm interested in what everyone thinks. 
i haven't been through my hives in a few weeks other than popping the tops.  yesterday i went to pop the tops and they are glued down TIGHT.
we always used to say that years where they used a lot of propolis were followed by cold winters.  i have nothing to back that up but i'm interested in hearing anyone's thoughts on it.
there hasn't been a flow on for maybe three weeks now.  i suspect it's just the bees being industrious really.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2013, 10:38:27 AM »

>we always used to say that years where they used a lot of propolis were followed by cold winters.  i have nothing to back that up but i'm interested in hearing anyone's thoughts on it.

IMO there is no connection.  Some bees make more propolis than others.  Some years they might make more, but I don't see that it corresponds to a harsher winter, it's probably just a good year for poplar trees...
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
10framer
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« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2013, 09:56:44 AM »

yeah, that's kind of what i've always thought too.  i wonder if the use of propolis hasn't increased due to the arrival of the hive beetle.  could be that bees that shut out the unguarded points of entry don't have the major infestation problems as often.  the swarm i caught this year immediately layed down a ton of propolis everywhere.  within a week of hiving them working them became a sticky mess.
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BlueBee
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« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2013, 01:26:47 AM »

it's a long way off but i'm interested in what everyone thinks.
Here's what I think:  It's not going to be very cold in Georgia next winter, or any winter.  grin

Sorry, I couldn't resist. Wink  I see a lot of variability in the amount of propolis the different colonies make.  I haven't noticed a correlation between propolis and winter YET, but I haven't been looking.  I'm still trying to figure out if those darn wooly bears can predict winter weather or not  huh
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10framer
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« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2013, 10:59:15 AM »

it's all relative blue.  i remember single digit lows when i was a kid and ponds would freeze over for a week or two sometimes up until about 15 years ago. 
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Finski
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« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2013, 04:45:51 PM »

.
How forexcample people can predict one year forward, because they do not remember, what happened a year ago.


.
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Better.to.Bee.than.not
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« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2013, 04:55:45 PM »

I was actually just thinking yesterday about how much propolis I am seeing this year. I am not linking it to a cold winter, but obviously it is something. Would almost be nice to know everything, but probably boring. Interesting theories though, but I'm thinking yea, probably more to do with for instance how many peoples are growing or some such.
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JWChesnut
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« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2013, 10:06:59 PM »

What race are your bees?  If they have silvery hairs over a dark body they likely have high component of Caucasian strain.  Caucasian bees are famous for their collection of propolis.

 The wild survivor bees in my area have high Caucasian mix -- I live in a foggy coastal area with many deep-throated wild flowers (like California Black Sage).  The specific traits of Caucasian bees -- long tongues, rapid adjustment of brood to flow, and cool weather performance are adapted to this area.  Caucasian and rosemary, oregano and lavender are made for each other. 
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