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Author Topic: First cut out complete!  (Read 256 times)
dfizer
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Location: Ballston Spa, New York


« on: June 21, 2013, 10:50:59 PM »

Well - as the title says - my first cut out is officially complete.  As far as cut out's go this was a pretty easy one.  The bees were in an over hang so as soon as I removed the bottom board to get access from underneath the rest was history.  The comb completely filled two medium boxes.  I don't know if this is a big cut out or not however it was exciting for me.  The problem is that I now have a mess in the hive....  There is honey everywhere! I rubber banded all the comb into frames.  I left the hive under where the bees were entering the eave for a day.  Today when I went I move the hive I noticed an enormous amount of honey dripping out of entrance.  I am sure this is from cutting the comb to fit into the frame.  Is there any thing I can do about this?  I have a lot of ants around my hive stand and have been battling the heck out of them.  This will be a feast for them!  Furthermore, I moved this hive to my apiary which already has 8 hives and 2 nucs.  I am sure the other bees are going to begin robbing!  Can I stop this, and if so how?

One additional question - how long will it take until the bees fill in the comb and secure it to the frames?  I assume that they will chew the rubber-bands once they are ready for them to be removed - is this correct?  How long should I wait until I check for new eggs?  I did not see the queen however there were a lot of bees in the bee vac. 

Thanks for the additional advice for post cutout hive management. 

David


David
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Bees In Miami
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« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2013, 01:22:42 AM »

dfizer...When I do a cut out, I have a bucket beside me for disposal of honey comb.  I do not frame it up, for the very reason you are talking about.  Barring any signs of disease, this comb can be strained and fed back to the bees in a controlled fashion.  I would get it out of the hive, and leave only the framed brood comb.   Did you get the queen?   (FWIW, I trash all the drone comb, too).   The bees will take care of the rubber bands when their work is complete.  You'll start seeing some bands on the ground in front of the hives in a few days.   grin  It always makes me laugh...































































3.  I do not place it in the hive. 
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chux
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« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2013, 01:54:07 PM »

I agree with Bees In Miami. I'm new, but I've done several cut outs already this season. Don't put much honey comb in the box. Usually, there will be a little honey at the top of some of the brood comb I cut out. A very little will be okay. Bees can clean it up quick. But the vast majority goes into a cooler. I use another bucket or two for comb that looks too old or is empty, usually toward the bottom of an older colony. If there is LOTS of uncapped honey, or pollen, that will go in here too. The bees will rob it once they get to the bee yard. After I crush and strain the honey comb, I put the wax out for the bees to clean too. I also leave the cooler out for them after I have drained honey out of it. There will be a coating inside, I leave to give them a boost as they rob it. Honey comb cut out and put in your hive will be trouble. 
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