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Author Topic: New to Beekeeping  (Read 12689 times)

Offline Meadlover

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #60 on: December 01, 2013, 07:41:15 PM »
Great posts, love the photos!
I really love the look of a new fully drawn foundationless frame of brood  :-D

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #61 on: December 01, 2013, 07:52:14 PM »
Cheers Meadlover

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #62 on: December 15, 2013, 08:55:59 AM »
Just did a cut out on a compost bin. The hive had obviously collapsed a couple of times as most of it lay at the bottom of the bin. The owner said it had been there for three months. Very small bees, I think they were really struggling.

Only two frames of comb could be tied into frames. I put the wonky comb onto a couple of nucs that I moved home after dark.

My plan for tomorrow is to put the two frames I cut out with four frames of honey and brood from my strong hive. If the queen is in there, it will be my third hive. If there is no queen I will do a newspaper combine with my weak hive.

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #63 on: December 15, 2013, 11:50:09 PM »
Hi all,

Here is the nuc that I used to transport the comb I could not tie into frames.



So much wasted broken comb



I could only save three frames of comb.



So I filled the hive with the three frames from the cut out, four frames of nectar and capped brood from my stong hive, one foundationless frame and two dummies. I had no capped honey to give them so I guess I will feed this hive.


Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #64 on: December 16, 2013, 12:47:32 AM »
Something is going on with this new cut out. I am hoping they will settle down by themselves.


Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #65 on: December 16, 2013, 03:32:03 AM »
OK I know what's happening now.

The bees were trying to build comb on the underside of the hive handle on the front of the hive. I opened up the hive and the bees were not overcrowded but I replaced the two dummy frames with empty foundationless ones just in case. I also put bigger entrance reducer on which seems to have helped. I will add a super as soon as I can.



......................................................................

The jar feeders are now set up for the new cut out. I'm using 2:1 syrup because I hear that it keeps better.

I also inspected the old cut out hive today. There are eggs on 6 frames in the broodbox so I think it is beginning to turn around. I didn't switch it's location with the strong hive but I probably would have done if I hadn't seen any improvement.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2013, 05:03:36 AM by Oak »

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #66 on: December 19, 2013, 10:12:19 PM »
There is a queen in my new cut out which is great. I haven't seen her but she appears to have a good laying pattern. So glad I don't have to deal with a queenless hive again.

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #67 on: January 07, 2014, 11:13:21 PM »
I will let you know how two layers of gutter guard and a kitty litter tray full of cooking oil works as a hive beetle trap.



For anyone who is interested in this approach. Bees are able to get through the gutter guard even when two layers are placed over each other to provide the smallest possible opening.

I am going back to solid wooden bottoms for now.

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #68 on: January 09, 2014, 11:32:37 PM »
Hi all,

I put a second super (10 frames of empty foundationless) on my first cut out hive because the bees were really crowding the entrance in this 30 degree C heat.



Still, they continue to festoon at the entrance. I even saw one doing a waggle dance in the middle of the bee mass.

The entrance is about 10mm (half and inch) high and 100mm (four inches) wide. Should I make a bigger entrance?




Offline bernsad

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #69 on: January 09, 2014, 11:35:12 PM »
I reckon I'd be making that entrance wider, they will struggle to get enough air circulating in there.

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #70 on: January 09, 2014, 11:54:54 PM »
Thanks Bernsad,

I think I will double the entrance size and then maybe go back to a 6 inch entrance when the weather is cooler.

Cheers

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #71 on: January 10, 2014, 12:37:31 AM »
Thanks again bernsad. An eight inch entrance seems to have fixed the problem.



I replaced the hive beetle trap with a solid floor while I was there.

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #72 on: February 04, 2014, 01:47:07 AM »
Hi all,

It's been a while since I posted here so I think it's time for an update. All three hives are fine and I stopped feeding the new one when I put a super on it.

So I have been doing a little high risk stump removal. My advice for anyone attempting this is: When a stray bit of bark hits a beehive....run.



Here is my ant proof hive stand experiment. Unfortunately the upside down black tray doesn't completely prevent ants, especially when they were already nesting under the bottom board. Maybe if I use more grease on it's underside of the tray it will be truly ant proof:



My new waterer is a partial success. I will replace the wooden platform with thicker timber because the stuff I used warped. Also a deeper bucket would not need to be filled as often:





So all in all things are pretty good. I am enjoying this part of year as I don't need to inspect the hives as frequently as in the spring.

Offline AyeBee

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #73 on: February 21, 2014, 08:25:37 PM »
Hi Oak - how has your new ant-proofing gone? I've only just got into keeping bees and lost my first nuc to a combination of daily robbing from another hive elsewhere, and then with the hive weak the ants moved in and helped to wipe out the hive. If your method seems to work I might bet myself another lot of bees and give it a try.

Andy

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #74 on: February 21, 2014, 10:48:43 PM »
Hi Andy,

I have not tried adding more grease yet. Although I don't really have an ant problem yet, it is still early days. There are other ant proof hive stand designs  I have seen on this site which have been tested better than mine.

I have visited a commercial beekeeper in NSW and he mixes the flea control product Frontline with honey and squirts it around the hives in the evening. Apparently the ants find it and take it back to the nest where it will poison the colony.

Obviously it would be really bad if the bees found the poison first.

Regards

Offline AyeBee

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #75 on: February 22, 2014, 05:41:13 PM »
I'd never thought of using Frontline, interesting! But knowing my luck the bees would get into it someone, and goodbye bees!

Offline sawdstmakr

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #76 on: February 25, 2014, 12:17:43 PM »
Hi Andy,

I have not tried adding more grease yet. Although I don't really have an ant problem yet, it is still early days. There are other ant proof hive stand designs  I have seen on this site which have been tested better than mine.

I have visited a commercial beekeeper in NSW and he mixes the flea control product Frontline with honey and squirts it around the hives in the evening. Apparently the ants find it and take it back to the nest where it will poison the colony.

Obviously it would be really bad if the bees found the poison first.

Regards

If you mix it with honey, the bees will be the ones that take it back to their nest. Unless it is cold, your bees are walking around the hive at night and they will smell and find the laced sugar.
I would not do it.
Jim
"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain

Offline yantabulla

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #77 on: February 25, 2014, 03:06:52 PM »
Honey & fiprinol.

Words fail me.
All setbacks are temporary

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #78 on: February 25, 2014, 07:26:50 PM »
Hi Andy,

I have not tried adding more grease yet. Although I don't really have an ant problem yet, it is still early days. There are other ant proof hive stand designs  I have seen on this site which have been tested better than mine.

I have visited a commercial beekeeper in NSW and he mixes the flea control product Frontline with honey and squirts it around the hives in the evening. Apparently the ants find it and take it back to the nest where it will poison the colony.

Obviously it would be really bad if the bees found the poison first.

Regards

If you mix it with honey, the bees will be the ones that take it back to their nest. Unless it is cold, your bees are walking around the hive at night and they will smell and find the laced sugar.
I would not do it.
Jim

I agree it is too risky. Ant proof hive stands all the way.

Oak

Offline Oak

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Re: New to Beekeeping
« Reply #79 on: February 25, 2014, 07:31:11 PM »
Honey & fiprinol.

Words fail me.


I wouldn't be too hard on the beekeeper. It's obviously working for him.