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Author Topic: cut out and foundationless frames??  (Read 256 times)
chux
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« on: June 05, 2013, 11:33:51 AM »

I did my first cut out a couple of weeks ago. Used rubberbands to hold brood comb in place to fill a deep lang. The comb was standing in the frames pretty straight. One mistake I know I made was completely filling each frame. The comb came out of a wall, and was wide enough that I could cut the same height as the frame, then put three or four pieces side by side in each frame. (In hindsight, I would have been better off only putting two pieces in each frame, and leaving plenty of room for the bees to connect.) As it is, the combs were lined up pretty good and held in place with rubber bands.

The day after I put the box in the yard, I went to look at the entrance. Bees were pulling out rubberbands. They had pulled out several bands. I peeked inside and saw that most of the frames had lost their rubberbands and the comb was not straight. I pulled a few frames out and straightened a bit, but the comb was unstable. I decided to let them attach better and not risk dropping brood comb full of bees, so I left it alone for a couple of days. When I went back in, the comb was attached pretty good, but it's not straight on all the frames. I pulled a few frames and noticed that three queen cells had hatched. (I probably didn't get the queen in the cut out) Last thing I wanted was to kill a new queen, so I closed it up and left it alone. I have added a medium with foundationless frames on top. As of yesterday, they had not started building up there yet, but it looked like they were starting to hang on the starter strip of wood a bit up there.

Here is my question: What should I do about that brood comb that is a bit wonky in the deep? Should I leave it alone until next season and try to rotate it out of the hive? Should I go in and try to clean it up now?
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iddee
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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2013, 12:03:46 PM »

Clean it up after the second box is drawn, or next season. Leave them alone as much as feasible for the time being.
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chux
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« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2013, 12:45:21 PM »

That sounds good, but that leaves me with another question. How long do I need to wait to verify that there is a queen present? Since they are just getting started building out comb on top, I wonder how long it will take for the queen to start laying up there. Will they be making honey up there, or more brood? Probably both. I got a lot of bees in the cut out. And there was lots of capped brood. I assume the brood present when I did the cut out, has recently hatched. So I feel like I need to know within a couple of weeks whether I need to order a queen or not. If I wait too long to put a new queen in, these bees may not live long enough to raise her brood. Would you do a slow, careful inspection of the bottom, just long enough to see any new larvae? Would you wait a week longer and let them build out on top and check just the top?

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hardwood
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« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2013, 12:47:30 PM »

You say that three queen cells had hatched...wait at least two weeks (I prefer 3) to take a look for eggs.

Scott
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chux
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« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2013, 02:26:34 PM »

OK. Let me give exact date. I did the cutout on May 16. I saw 6 or 7 capped queen cells. Several had those whitish lines that I believe means they are near hatching. When I checked on May 20, give or take 1 day, I saw that three of the cells had hatched. I stopped inspection at that point, and haven't been back in there. So, 3 weeks from the time that they hatched would be on Jun 9 or 10. This weekend, I'll look in the bottom for larvae. Thanks guys.

« Last Edit: June 05, 2013, 05:44:09 PM by chux » Logged
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