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Author Topic: gorilla glue  (Read 2231 times)
bill
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« on: December 30, 2005, 01:55:45 PM »

I have a bunch of older hives some good and some not so good. I want to go through and repair as many as possible. I have heard a lot of good things about gorilla glue, how it expands and fills the cavities. what I am wonderiang if anyone has had experience with bees, like if they dont like the smell or other tips.  thanks a lot
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billiet
bee crazy
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Location: west central Indiana


« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2005, 01:49:24 AM »

Bill, polyeurathane glue (gorilla glue) has no affects on the bees. It will foam up if you apply water to the joint..and you will want to. Once it drys cut off the excess glue, thats all. Tip, buy the Elmers brand...same stuff, half the price wink

Steve
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Steve

www.cozynestfarm.com

All that's golden must bee honey!
Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2005, 03:47:07 PM »

I used the elmers, it works just as good. I used it to repair old hive bodies and supers given to me by a friend. Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
Jay
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« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2005, 03:56:11 PM »

Quote from: bee crazy
Bill, polyeurathane glue (gorilla glue) has no affects on the bees. It will foam up if you apply water to the joint..and you will want to. Once it drys cut off the excess glue, thats all. Tip, buy the Elmers brand...same stuff, half the price wink

Steve


Bill, I agree with Steve. I use polyurathane glue to assemble all of my boxes, as well as all of my frames (I use wood frames) and the girls don't care one way or the other! There is some debate about the need to glue and nail or if nailing is enough. The equipment gets mighty weighty when full of honey and bees, (even one frame of honey) and the idea of a frame, or worse an entire box, comming apart while I am holding it and 10,000 angry bees looking me in the eye and saying WELL!?! is not a happy thought, so I use glue in addition to nails! Cheesy
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2005, 04:01:15 PM »

I agree jay, glue and nail! I only nailed my first 2 hives and after a year you can notice a few weak spots, nothing major but they are being fixed this spring so they dont fall apart latter. All my new hives are getting nailed and glued from now on. Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2005, 04:02:18 PM »

Bill,
I always nail and glue. I used gorilla glue this year. I cannot see an advantage over Tightbond II unless expanding adhesive for filling the cracks is an important concern for you. I am going back to Tightbond carpenters glue.

Good luck.
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