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Author Topic: My First Hive  (Read 539 times)
Bee Intrigued
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Location: Independence, KY


« on: May 28, 2013, 01:24:28 PM »

Hello, Name is Jim.

I posted last year around this time, and about two weeks ago, I started my first hive. When I called the gentleman I purchased my hive from, he informed me that he had already sold all of his packaged bees, but he would sell me an unpainted hive. I was instructed to paint the hive, and then he would transfer one of his hives into my box. All went well, and the bees are doing great. Last week I put the second box on top with fresh wax frames, and a queen excluder in between. After a couple days I didn't see any movement. I was instructed to move a frame from below without brood, to the top. The frame I moved was a frame that the bees had begun to build comb. There have been a few bees on this frame in the top section, and there is some honey being stored in this comb.

I did see another frame below that was completely covered with comb and honey, and they had began to cap the comb in the upper corner. I wanted to move this one to the top, but it looked as if there were a couple cells that had brood. Would it be advisable to move this frame to the top, or should I just let everything be?


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Bees In Miami
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Location: Davie, Florida


« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2013, 01:55:12 PM »

I would let everything go.  They won't build in more space than they need.  They will expand to the upper box when they need the room.  Where are you located?  Has your flow started?
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Bee Intrigued
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Location: Independence, KY


« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2013, 02:23:40 PM »

I'm located in Independence, KY, which is just 15 minutes south of Cincinnati. I'm assuming you're referring to the nectar flow? I have no idea. This is new to me, and I'm trying to take in as much as I can. I do know that the black locust trees were really blooming good over the last couple weeks, as well as the honey suckle, but both are done now. I see bees entering the hive with white, yellow and orange pollen. I wish I had more time to read the forum, but I'm burning the candle at both ends. The hive is on my deck, facing southeast, with the entrance right up against the spindles, below the handrail. I sit next to it every morning enjoying a couple cups of coffee. I've had the top off a few times and the bees never bother me. My soon to be nine year old daughter is not afraid of them either, and she knows how to be around them. Many thanks.
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Jeregano
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Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2013, 02:46:14 PM »

I am also new and in the Cincy area. (In Springfield Township actually) and looking for some more in depth information on our flow from here on out too.
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lesleylupo
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Location: Tucson AZ


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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2013, 03:48:34 PM »

Hi all,
My name is Lesley and I live in Tucson where we have to deal with the Africanized bees. I have 2 top bar and 2 Langstroths so far. I'm also interested in the Perone hives and am still researching them. Do either of you have the wacko bees in Florida or Kentucky?
Thanks!
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mikecva
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Location: Northern Virginia USA


« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2013, 05:28:36 PM »

Hello Jim,

You did not say if you boxes were deeps or mediums. If you only have the one box under the excluder, you might do a lot better to remove the excluder so the queen can expand the brood area. Normal hive arrangements under the excluder include: 2 full boxes; 3 mediums; 1 full and 2 mediums and in areas that can support a very large brood: 3 fulls. Above the excluder will be 'your' honey. If you have a strong back you can use any combination you like. At my age, I only use mediums (for brood and honey). You will find arguments for and against excluders so I am not going to open that can of worms. -Mike
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Listen to others but make your own decisions. That way you own the results.
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Bee Intrigued
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Location: Independence, KY


« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2013, 12:19:08 AM »

The gentleman I bought the hive and bees from called them High Boxes. After looking at various pics online and in a book, they are referred to as deep boxes. I can always add a medium can't I, and move the excluder up above the second box? I don't want to neglect anyone's opinion on here, but to edify the gentleman's experience I bought the bees from, he's been raising bees and queens since 1975. His honey can be found at local Kroger grocery stores. I value his advice, but I also value experience from anyone here on this forum. Thanks again.

Lesley...I don't have enough experience to know about the wacko bees, but I'm not going to rule it out. I know the bees I have seem to be very gentle.
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adgjoan
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Location: Northern KY


« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2013, 06:08:13 AM »

Welcome to the neighborhood, Bee Intrigued!!  I am in the same city.  PM me if you want.

Joan
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L Daxon
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Location: Oklahoma City


« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2013, 10:28:05 AM »

I agree with mikecva.  Don't know why you would be using a queen excluder at this stage of the game.  The first year the goal is usually just to build comb and brood and "maybe" get a tiny bit of honey for yourself, but not usually.   Don't take any honey off until you know what kind of dearth you may run into later in the summer where the bees will need the honey.  It is better health wise to leave them their own honey than to harvest what you want and then try to build their stores back up with sugar syrup.  The syrup just doesn't have the same nutrients in it that the honey does and syrup is better just used for new build up or to keep a hive from starving in a bad flow year.

It is better your first year to get a good, strong hive going and for you as a beekeeper to develop good management habits.  Read, read, read; find a good bee club to attend; and ask questions on this board.  You will get off to a good start.

ld
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linda d
Bee Intrigued
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Location: Independence, KY


« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2013, 03:00:31 PM »

Trust me, I'm in no hurry to get any honey from the hive. I was told the bees will need about 50lbs of honey for the winter. If I do take any, it will be in the fall, or as late as it can be harvested, without taking any that the bees will need. The gentleman I purchased the hive from, basically moved one of his hives into mine. There is a lot of brood in the hive already, and a few frames in the bottom that are empty, or just starting. I have some pics, but cannot post any yet per forum rules.
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