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Author Topic: frames with wire?  (Read 731 times)
dfizer
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« on: May 14, 2013, 11:07:09 AM »

Hello all -

I have used pierco frames from the get go however I saw some frames with wires on them at the local beekeeping shop - how do these frames work... I know they were wood frames but couldn't see how the wires were attached or what they were on there for...

I realize this is a rather naive question since I believe that frames with wire are relatively common - it's just that I have never come across them yet.  Please educate me, especially to the pluses and minuses of using them!

David
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Finski
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2013, 11:16:21 AM »

.
Guys do not wire their frames for fun.
It is needed.
.
One year I made 100 unwired medium frames. After 2 yeas all have went broken in extraction.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2013, 12:01:21 PM »

Wiring was invented to prevent foundation from sagging before it was drawn.
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dfizer
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« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2013, 03:49:58 PM »

ok but how does it work?  does the wire go vertically or horizontally?  what does it look like before the bees draw out the comb?  How do you get started with a wired frame?  What type of wire is used?  Do you need to wire your deep frames that are never going to be in an extractor?  I am curious but confused at the same time given I have read a lot about folks going foundationless - does this imply no wires either?  I have a cut out to do and was going to simply cut the comb and rubber band it into the frames.... but now I am reconsidering this given the information from Finski.  I do not want to have significant issues come extraction time...

David
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Finski
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« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2013, 04:49:22 PM »

  Do you need to wire your deep frames that are never going to be in an extractor? 

My every frame is some day in extractor.

But you should get basics of beekeeping somewhere, In this forum everything is impossible.

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dfizer
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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2013, 09:29:00 PM »

I guess I'll just stick to the pierco frames and explore the other options at some other point. 
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Sunnyboy2
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« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2013, 09:36:48 PM »

Fatbeeman has a good video or three an wiring in foundation on youtube.  Several other vids there also.  I use sections of plaztic coundation and empty frames so I have not wired myself.  Good luck with the girls.
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Steel Tiger
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« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2013, 09:42:53 PM »

Here's a video by WallsBeeMan putting the frame together, putting the wire on and embedding the wire into the foundation.
 It's step by step instructions.
 
Frames and Wires

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tecumseh
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« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2013, 06:34:20 AM »

well actually the wire is fairly traditional and contrary to what some suggest above 1) keeps the foundation straight and 2) limits sagging of the comb after it is drawn and after it is filled with honey.  it will 3) greatly reduce the number of combs that 'blow out' during extraction.

wire is traditionally set in horizontally but can also be placed in the vertical position.  I have been told that Jim Powers (who at the time was the largest beekeeper in the US and was half of the original founders of Kona Queens) had all his frames wired vertically and you could literally run over these with a truck and never destroy the frames.
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I am 'the panther that passes in the night'... tecumseh.
Finski
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« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2013, 07:57:31 AM »

.
Top bar and lower bar burr must be cleaned often. In this job vertical wires will be broken.
Yes, I first had them in mediums. Not good.
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melliferal
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« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2013, 09:48:58 AM »

I guess I'll just stick to the pierco frames and explore the other options at some other point.

This would be my suggestion also; it's what I did.  Spend a couple of seasons getting to know the gals, and then start experimenting with all the neat stuff that's out there.

With wax foundation it's pretty neat; there's different gauges for different purposes, and it comes pre-wired or unwired if you want to wire it on your own.  Plus, having some wax foundation laying out and stacked on a shelf or something ensures your workshop/storage closet/shed/basement always smells like sweet beeswax.

I eventually gravitated back toward plasticell, but by all means give it a try - there are many beeks who use nothing else.
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dfizer
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« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2013, 06:57:13 PM »

I've been keeping bees for 4 years now and I kind of like the idea of the plastic foundation and wooden frames.  I have not had issues at all with the bees taking to the pierco frames.  They seem to draw them out just fine.  I would like to see how the wax foundation holds up during the extraction process...  I'm going to keep on doing what I've been doing and keep my fingers crossed.

David
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don2
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« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2013, 07:14:06 PM »

Go slow to begin with on wax foundation. extract about half on the first side, flip to the other side, take it slow again but this time you can finish the second side before you flip back to side one. First year comb is always tricky. The more it is attached to the bottom bar and the end bars, the less stress when spinning. The bees will repair and re-enforce each time you put it back in the hive.  shocked Smiley d2
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L Daxon
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« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2013, 09:13:14 PM »

If you use all plastic foundation you won't be able to make any cut comb honey, which many of my clients, as well as me.  I use a mix of all three: plastic, wired foundation and the thin cut comb foundation.  I try to use my plastic is the brood chamber mostly so I can tell has mostly been brood comb.  The wood frames have either been extracted with an extractor or havested with the crush and strain method.

Linda D.
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