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Author Topic: What are they dying from?  (Read 665 times)
2Sox
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« on: May 12, 2013, 09:03:26 PM »

I posted this recently because I thought this swarm I caught might have been exposed to pesticides.  But now I'm not so sure because I'm learning that the symptoms of pesticide poisoning closely resemble classic symptoms of acute bee paralysis virus or CBPV.  I gave this swarm some frames of honey from my colonies that died this winter.  Could the honey be harboring these viruses? 

I caught this swarm on Tuesday and about 2/3 have expired.  Dead and dying on the ground outside the hive entrance. No foraging flights.  Shaking, wings apart on top of frames.  None noticeably hairless as in ABPV.  But the strange thing is that they are building comb.

If my honey has the possibility of being tainted, I don't want bees going near it.
Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2013, 09:26:16 PM »

might they have been sprayed before you picked them up.  i find that folks lie about that a lot.
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2Sox
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« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2013, 09:49:14 PM »

might they have been sprayed before you picked them up.  i find that folks lie about that a lot.

I could see how that may be true.  But these bees were flying all over the place when I got there.  If I hadn't had the box lured with lemongrass and two frames of honey, they might have not stayed.  I shook a branch of bees into the box and the rest started marching in.  I stayed around for awhile and returned at nightfall when the last ones went inside.  This was in the driveway of a private house in a very upscale neighborhood.  Right next to a golf course. Literally.  On the other side of the driveway!  The homeowner said he'd check with his gardener and the golf course groundskeeper about recent pesticide use.  Haven't heard back yet.  Homeowner loves bees.  He wouldn't be the one to spray.  He even took photos of the episode.
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"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism
beek1951
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« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2013, 10:40:11 PM »

You didn't perchance vacuum them up, did you?
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2Sox
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« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2013, 07:41:18 AM »

You didn't perchance vacuum them up, did you?

No. Just popped a bunch in the box and the rest followed.
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"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism
edward
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« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2013, 07:57:46 AM »

wings apart on top of frames.

At the moment I cant remember what it is but there is some ailment that is diagnosed by this.

The wings form a "K" form.

I'll ask around if nobody beats me to it.


mvh Edward  tongue
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edward
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« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2013, 12:39:42 PM »

Sounds a bit like trake mites  ( Acarapis woodi )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acarapis_woodi

mvh Edward  tongue
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bailey
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« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2013, 04:17:00 PM »

Any chance some of the honey fermented in the comb?
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melliferal
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« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2013, 08:58:45 PM »

I posted this recently because I thought this swarm I caught might have been exposed to pesticides.  But now I'm not so sure because I'm learning that the symptoms of pesticide poisoning closely resemble classic symptoms of acute bee paralysis virus or CBPV.  I gave this swarm some frames of honey from my colonies that died this winter.  Could the honey be harboring these viruses?  

Short answer - yes, it could; there could be a few things wrong with that honey in fact.  One of the very first things I ever learned from my first mentor was, never put honey in a hive it didn't come out of - not in any amount, and this to include extracted honey.  He was quite adamant.  And the reason is exactly that - you have no idea whether or not anything's wrong with the honey.  If you had a deadout and there's significant honey left, you're better off just saving it and extracting it along with your usual harvest.
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