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Author Topic: Setting comb into empty frames, we did it!  (Read 2293 times)
Beefunkrailroad
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« on: May 10, 2013, 11:25:29 AM »

This is a follow up to another thread "New Hive has comb attacheched to lid, need advice."
You guys gave me some awesome advice and as soon as I could get out to the bee yard we cut the comb and set it in the empty frames with rubberbands.
Queen was laying eggs too, we are very excited.  Its a good thing we were told a way to save this comb.
We used the hive tool to cut the combs off the lid after smoking and brushing the bees off the best we could.  BTW I did use an improvised hand full of soft grass to brush off the bees as suggested by hardwood (Scott).
I feel like this is going to be a good year, we are having a good mild spring here in Kentucky with lots of good rain.  
 



 
« Last Edit: May 10, 2013, 11:37:16 AM by Robo » Logged
Moots
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2013, 11:41:31 AM »

Nicely done....Good Job!

One piece of friendly advice...lose the gloves and life as a Beek becomes a lot simpler.  Smiley
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RC
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2013, 11:55:06 AM »

x2
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L Daxon
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2013, 11:58:02 AM »

x3

It may seem scary at first, but once you do it, you will understand why it is important.  You squash way fewer bees and have a much better grip on the frames.  It took me 10 years to try it, but once i did 3 years ago, I haven't had gloves on since.

Linda D.
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linda d
Beefunkrailroad
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2013, 12:09:33 PM »

You are right.
Seems like we are always taking off gloves so we can use a tool or light the smoker.  Im not sure if I will have any luck convincing the wife to take off her gloves tho lol.
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Robo
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« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2013, 12:20:57 PM »

Have her try Nitrile rubber gloves.  Still gives her protection against stings,  but gives much better dexterity.  And you can just dispose of them when they get covered with propolis.  I actually prefer to wear the Nitrile gloves over going bare handed just for the propolis issue....
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Bees In Miami
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« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2013, 01:28:21 PM »

Good for you!  Your first cut-out....sorta....  applause

Nice laying pattern, too.  Look at all the brood and larvae that would have been lost.   bee  Good save!   applause
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dfizer
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« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2013, 03:50:45 PM »

Nicely done....Good Job!

One piece of friendly advice...lose the gloves and life as a Beek becomes a lot simpler.  Smiley

You'd have countless bee stings at my hot hive right now if you lost the gloves.  For instance, was just stung 2 times - once on each wrist - while mowing the grass.  My yard is 200 feet from the bee hives.

Some times they are a necessity!  Just sayin!

David
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Moots
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« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2013, 04:41:41 PM »


You'd have countless bee stings at my hot hive right now if you lost the gloves.  For instance, was just stung 2 times - once on each wrist - while mowing the grass.  My yard is 200 feet from the bee hives.

Some times they are a necessity!  Just sayin!

David

David,
I can promise you this...If I had bees wearing me out while I'm trying to cut grass 200 feet from their hive, I wouldn't be worried about getting gloves!  I'd be worried about getting new bees, or a new queen instead....Just sayin!  grin
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Beefunkrailroad
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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2013, 04:43:35 PM »

So is a hot aggressive hive a sign that the queen is in trouble or dead?  I have read so many contradictory facts about that.
I guess the theory is that if the queen is laying and producing good then the hive will be less aggressive?
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Moots
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« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2013, 05:29:49 PM »

So is a hot aggressive hive a sign that the queen is in trouble or dead?  I have read so many contradictory facts about that.
I guess the theory is that if the queen is laying and producing good then the hive will be less aggressive?


BFRR,
I think a queenless hive can be testy...but what I'm referring to is just the general disposition of a hive.  The queen controls the genetics and mood of a hive, so SOP for calming down a hot hive is to requeen it.  Some people tolerate a hot hive because they claim the bees aggressive behavior carries over into aggressive honey production.  Personally, I'm not interested in bees that will be aggressive enough to sting me unprovoked when I'm 200 feet from their hive, no matter how much honey they produce.  Smiley   
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"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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bailey
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« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2013, 06:00:11 PM »

Good job.  As far as the gloves try platex kitchen gloves.  They can sting through it but not often and they don't react badly to them like skin.
Bailey
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Dunkel
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« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2013, 07:33:21 PM »

Speaking as a teacher in KY.  You should never have bags from the teacher store available in May, LOL. Congrats!
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Georgia Boy
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« Reply #13 on: May 10, 2013, 07:49:02 PM »

Y'all did a great job on saving the comb.  applause applause applause applause applause

Looks like you have a good laying queen too. Congratulations!!!   cheer cheer cheer cheer

I have to agree with the guys on the glove thing. I have only had bees for three weeks tomorrow. My first 4 inspections I did with gloves and a smoker. However now I will have the smoker just in case, but it seems to upset the bees more when I smoke them than when I just go into the hive without it. I do like the smoker when I am closing up the hive to move the bees off the top of the frames.

My last inspection I did it without gloves and the bees weren't even on my hands at all. Before when I wore gloves they were on the gloves. So no more gloves for me. I like that you can feel everything you are doing. I like that if I need the bees to move off an area of the comb I just lightly lay my hand on them and they move out of the way.

All that being said if they turn mean I will wear them again. But so far my girls are very sweet and calm even when I just open the super a crack just to take a peek.

Again way to go you guys.

David

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Moots
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« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2013, 08:32:47 PM »

David,

Any chance that maybe you're over smoking them?  That's about the only time I've ever heard of smoke upsetting them.  My understanding with smoke is that a little bit goes a long way and too much will aggravate them and be ineffective.

I use just a couple of puffs at the entrance and one or two under the cover, more over than in the hive. Then I try to give them at least 2 to 3 minutes before going into the hive.
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"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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Georgia Boy
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« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2013, 08:59:01 PM »

Don't think I'm over smoking them. Everything I have read and watched says to use as little smoke as possible so I do.

That being said they just don't like smoke.
Before going into the hive you can barely hear any buzzing. They are very quiet and content. However even with only one light puff in the entrance and one light one under the cover and the buzzing goes up ten fold. So no more smoke except when I go to close them up to get them off the top of the frames.

I also make sure the smoke isn't hot.

My girls are just way calm and nice for me to smoke them.

Maybe they know smoking can cause cancer. LOL  grin

David
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dfizer
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« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2013, 10:04:45 PM »

David,
I can promise you this...If I had bees wearing me out while I'm trying to cut grass 200 feet from their hive, I wouldn't be worried about getting gloves!  I'd be worried about getting new bees, or a new queen instead....Just sayin!  grin
Moots -
Make no mistake about it - I am in the process of requeening this hive however until this process is complete I just have to bear with this nonsense they are putting me through.  I 100% agree that glove-less is the way to go for all the reasons mentioned however there are times when they are an absolute necessity - that's all I'm sayin!   grin   As my general rule - I don't wear gloves while performing inspections etc but when I get hit 4 times in less than 2 minutes I'll break them out.  They are always in my beekeeping supply kit. 

David

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Moots
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« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2013, 10:33:20 PM »


Moots -
Make no mistake about it - I am in the process of requeening this hive however until this process is complete I just have to bear with this nonsense they are putting me through.  I 100% agree that glove-less is the way to go for all the reasons mentioned however there are times when they are an absolute necessity - that's all I'm sayin!   grin   As my general rule - I don't wear gloves while performing inspections etc but when I get hit 4 times in less than 2 minutes I'll break them out.  They are always in my beekeeping supply kit.  


David,
Roger that...

I certainly never meant to imply that I had a give me death before you give me gloves policy!  grin

As with many things in life....I think a good glove rule is: "Better to have them, and not need them, then need them, and not have them".

I'm still very much a newbie at this...But I made the decision while doing my research long before ever getting my first bees that I wanted to go glove-less while working my bees, if possible.  I still bought a pair, I still keep them handy...But except for one, maybe two occasions in the 4 months I've owned bees, I haven't put them on.

In my opinion, I think the thought of working a hive without gloves is much more intimidating than the act of simply doing it.  I equate it to a kid waiting in line to ride a roller coaster, it doesn't matter how big and bad the ride is...It can never live up to the fear and anticipation that builds up while waiting in line the first time.  Once you ride it once, you've got it beat!  Smiley

In a similar fashion, I just think some folks need a nudge to take the gloves off the first time.... But hey, if 4 bees nail you in the first two minutes....by all means, put the gloves back on.  grin  
« Last Edit: May 11, 2013, 05:59:25 AM by Moots » Logged

"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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iddee
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« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2013, 11:33:54 PM »

Georgia boy, I am a new beek with only about 37 years of experience.I will go in a hive without gloves, without veil, even without shirt. If you are going in a hive without smoke in my presence, please give me 5 minutes notice. I want to be a minimum of 1 mile away. If you continue to raise the lid without smoking the entrance first, you will be posting about your 100 plus stings before you dropped the lid back down and ran. It will happen one day. Be sure to tell your family to post it here if you don't survive that many stings.

Beefunkrailroad, Congratulations on a job well done. You wear what makes you comfortable. If you can relax and be comfortable without gloves, do so. If it makes you nervous to be bare handed, wear gloves. I love to be able to light my smoker and open a hive wearing whatever I have on at the moment, but I am comfortable doing it. If I was uncomfortable otherwise, I would wear full suit every time. No 2 beeks are the same, and you should do what you feel good with. Time will relax the apprehension and you will eventually be able to do more with less.
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yantabulla
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« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2013, 05:47:03 AM »

Thanks Iddee, 

Beekeepers who don't use smoke are short term beekeepers.

Their abandoned hives spread disease.

Smoke is good.

Use it.

Yanta
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