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Author Topic: tree ID  (Read 292 times)
duck
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« on: May 09, 2013, 10:05:18 PM »

Anyone know what this might be?  I figure it to be some sort of Acacia or mimosa?  Any idea?  I have around 2 pounds of seeds Ive pulled from last years dried out seed pods that were still on the trees.



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duck
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« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2013, 10:32:52 PM »

found it.. Leucaena leucocephala

uhh blooms constantly the entire year.. Cheesy  the bees were on this stand of trees like 100 lbs of syrup just got poured out! saa-wheat

 Apiculture: L. leucocephala is in bloom almost throughout the year, providing constant forage to honey bees.
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Nature Coast Beek
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Suck it up, buttercup!


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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2013, 05:55:54 AM »

Quick check on da wiki looks like it is a mimosoid and has some other interesting properties:

Excellent source of high-protein cattle fodder

Leucaena leucocephala has been considered for biomass production, as its reported yield of foliage corresponds to a dried mass of 2000–20000 kg/ha/year, and that of wood 30–40 m³/ha/year, with up to twice those amounts in favorable climates. It is also efficient in nitrogen fixation, at more than 500 kg/ha/year. It has a very fast growth rate, young trees reach a height of more than 20 ft in two to three years.

The wiki does have it as highly invasive, although it isn't on the Florida list from what I saw. Also The seeds contain mimosine, an amino acid known to be toxic to nonruminant vertebrates.
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duck
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2013, 01:47:16 PM »

http://www.miamidade.gov/development/library/guidelines/prohibited-plant-species.pdf
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Nature Coast Beek
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2013, 03:14:14 PM »

Yeah, that looks like the Miami-Dade county list, but didn't see it on the 2011 state list. Anyhooo, hope you get a nice crop from it. Good luck and enjoy your b's.
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nietssemaj
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« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2013, 09:49:01 PM »

It is listed as a noxious weed on Florida EPPC's 2011 Invasive Plant Species List

Category I
Invasive exotics that are altering native plant communities by displacing native species, changing community structures or ecological functions, or hybridizing with natives. This definition does not rely on the economic severity or geographic range of the problem, but on the documented ecological damage caused.
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