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Author Topic: Initial findings of Winter Bee Colony Losses  (Read 268 times)

Offline dfizer

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Offline sterling

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Re: Initial findings of Winter Bee Colony Losses
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2013, 11:24:04 AM »
It would be interesting to know how many of these operations are using chemicals and how many were chemical free. :?

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Initial findings of Winter Bee Colony Losses
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2013, 12:11:09 PM »
>It would be interesting to know how many of these operations are using chemicals and how many were chemical free

That information was collected and I suspect as the data is analyzed those numbers will be published.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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Offline BlueBee

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Re: Initial findings of Winter Bee Colony Losses
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2013, 01:24:57 PM »
Thanks for the post.  That was interesting. 

I attempted to winter a good many small colonies (4 frames or less) this past winter and the cold did in a lot of them (but not all).  They froze in place after about the 4th cold wave.  I also lost a few larger colonies due to varroa (most of the bees had vamoosed before they froze).   I didn’t treat for mites, I will this year.  The cold was more deadly than varroa in my case.

 

anything