Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 22, 2014, 10:43:16 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: ants  (Read 1103 times)
tincan
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 89

Location: northeast wisconsin


« on: May 07, 2013, 09:04:45 PM »

just noticed a few maybe 15 ants on 2 of the hives how do I get rid of them I heard sprinkle cinnamon on ground around hive will keep them away
Logged
don2
Doak
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 351

Location: Hillsboro Georgia USA


« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2013, 09:13:54 PM »

Make you some hive stands with legs, strong, but small enough to fit in a 3 lb coffee or a large can that vegetables and fruit comes in. Check with local restaurants, they should have them. set the legs of the stand in the can and fill about half full of old used moter oil.  :)d2
Logged

Georgia Boy
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 500


Location: Winston, GA.


« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2013, 09:28:24 PM »

Hey tincan,

Had fire ants climbing mine. The cinnamon worked for about a day. Tried putting vaseline on the legs. That always worked to keep them off the hummingbird feeder but the ants build an ant bridge of dead ants and walked across the vaseline. I ended up waiting until after the bees had gone in for the night and then sprayed home defence on just the bottom of the legs of the stand. That was the only way I could get rid of them. Didn't want to spray but it was the only way for me to get rid of them. And there were a lot of them.

Was going to do the tin can and vegetable oil thing but we have had over 5 inches of rain since Friday. But will be trying it next time.
 
David
Logged

"Give it All You've Got"
"Never give up. Never surrender."
don2
Doak
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 351

Location: Hillsboro Georgia USA


« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2013, 09:33:05 PM »

Actually water will work if you can figure out how to keep the mosquitoes from breeding in the cans. Smiley d2
Logged

tincan
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 89

Location: northeast wisconsin


« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2013, 09:42:56 PM »

that might be easy i have hives on scaffold rings i had no use for
Logged
don2
Doak
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 351

Location: Hillsboro Georgia USA


« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2013, 09:52:12 PM »

Half way there. rolleyes Smiley d2
Logged

CJ
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 59

Location: NSW Australia


« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2013, 10:15:08 PM »

I use a product called 'Ant Rid' here (Active ingredient is Boron). Its a syrupy liquid that they apparently take back to the nest to wipe out the source rather than just the foragers. I put it straight down the holes so theres no chance the bees will get into it and it has worked great.
Logged
Better.to.Bee.than.not
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 479

Location: S-E Michigan


« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2013, 06:06:13 AM »

what happens with ants, and in what area? I have always heard the ants in other parts of the US can get a bit nasty, fire ants/etc. but here in Michigan I didn't think they were a issue. Is it just certain types of ants? What do the ants do? Can the bees defend themselves typically?
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13622


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2013, 08:59:55 AM »

15 ants is nothing...
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
TemeculaBeek
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 20

Location: Temecula, Of course!


« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2013, 03:15:42 PM »

what happens with ants, and in what area? I have always heard the ants in other parts of the US can get a bit nasty, fire ants/etc. but here in Michigan I didn't think they were a issue. Is it just certain types of ants? What do the ants do? Can the bees defend themselves typically?
In So Cal we have small black argentinian ants. Hives need some kind of moat to keep them out. I built my hive stand to include a 1/2 inch sheet of plywood that extends about 4 inches out from the hive boxes. This is to reduce the likelyhood of water getting in the oil jars. But then again we don't get REAL rainstorms here. If it rains it's mostly sprinkles. I tell people "It's not raining, you can still see across the street!"
Logged
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4167

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2013, 03:23:57 AM »

but here in Michigan I didn't think they were a issue. Is it just certain types of ants? What do the ants do? Can the bees defend themselves typically?
Yeah the bees can defend their hives from our ants, but they are a real pain in the butt if you use any low density foam in your bee keeping.  Those ants LOVE to tunnel through low density foam.  I still don't have a great solution for that problem yet. Sad
Logged
edward
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1194


Location: BÖNAN SWEDEN

FEED ME HONEY or I`ll smash your screen !


« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2013, 04:14:08 AM »

I still don't have a great solution for that problem yet. Sad

Painting helps against ants tunneling, and if you paint the started holes it helps stop them from coming back.

mvh Edward  tongue
Logged
dfizer
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 288

Location: Ballston Spa, New York


« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2013, 09:34:26 PM »

The outbuilding where I keep my unused supers is now getting hammered by the big black carpenter ants.  I want to use some pesticide to wipe them out however i am reluctant since the ants are going to and from my supers.  If I do use something to kill the ants - what's the possibility that they contaminate my honey supers?  I don't really know what they're going after since the bees pretty much cleaned them out last fall.... 

Help.
Logged
Better.to.Bee.than.not
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 479

Location: S-E Michigan


« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2013, 02:13:39 AM »

I know one thing that works to kill ants is get 20 mule team borax, and some jam. mix 1 scoop of borax to 10 of jam and mix it really good and let it sit out, or put smaller globs in different places. borax I believe also kills hive beetles too so yay I guess..... I used to mix piles of this in AZ to get rid of ants there. not sure how it effects bees though honestly, or if bees will be around your shed.
Logged
peter
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13

Location: southern NSW, Australia


« Reply #14 on: May 13, 2013, 02:41:23 AM »

I found a small bottle with a fitting cork and put some sugar in it. After soaking the sugar with Ant-Rid I cut a small chunk out of the cork, just big enough for a small black ant. I placed the bottle on its side beside the ant-trail leading to the hive (they had been lured by the sugar I was feeding my bees) and heaped a bit of dirt around it. Put a handy leaf on top of the bottle and stuck half a brick on that to stop any bees going after the sweetness. It worked well for ants over here. grin
Logged
dfizer
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 288

Location: Ballston Spa, New York


« Reply #15 on: May 13, 2013, 01:23:36 PM »

I like the idea of borax and jam.... going to try that.  I think they are going into the supers for the sweetness of the residual honey so this should do the trick.  btw - I hate carpenter ants....  They are the worst
David
Logged
Rob Sandberg
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 25

Location: Lake Elsinore Ca


« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2013, 05:26:06 PM »

I wrap the posts of my hive stands with mason's line , tight with no space between wraps for 4 inches. I then smear "TANGLE FOOT " all around it. I then place a cylinder made of 1/4 hardware cloth
around it about 4 inches out. The hardware cloth keeps leaves off the Tangle foot and bees off it. Every 3-5 days I pull on the twine , exposing fresh Tangle foot. When I get to the end of the string I apply more and slowly wind twine back on. This lasts about 4 windings / un windings till I scrape and repeat. Why are ants a problem and not uncles?
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.243 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 24, 2014, 02:52:02 AM
anything