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Author Topic: pollen  (Read 457 times)
tincan
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« on: May 07, 2013, 07:05:28 PM »

all the bees from 6 hives seem to be going straight to the willow brush 40 yards from hives is this where the pollen is coming from just didnt think of willow brush as source of pollen thanks
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Finski
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« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2013, 03:34:02 AM »

.
6 hives need lots of willows.
Propably they gather pollen inside radius of one mile.

.
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BlueBee
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« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2013, 04:04:06 AM »

What are the bees favorite willow (salix) ?

I have some Salix discolor (p willow) close to my hives and the bees were all over them collecting pollen last week.  They are the first willows that bloom here in the spring. They’re all done now.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salix_discolor

Some of my other willows are now blooming:  salix alba, salix flame, salix matsudana (aka corkscrew willow), salix babylonica (weeping willow) but I never see many bees on the other willows. 
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2013, 09:00:55 AM »

Pussywillow seems to be the earliest popular willow for the bees.  The bees are all over it when it blooms.
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Michael Bush
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BlueBee
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« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2013, 12:30:57 PM »

I've got a couple of low swampy spots I'm going to plant some more pussywillows.  The nice thing about willows is they're really easy to propagate!

The problem we have with pussywillow here is the Japanese beetles LOVE them.  They completely defoliate them in the summer.  That's long after the bees get their use from the willows, so it's not a big deal, but they do make for an ugly mess with all those beetles on them. Sad   
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danno
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« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2013, 01:10:25 PM »

most years the bee's here in Michigan and in Wisc. dont get to take full advantage of the willows because of weather
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edward
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« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2013, 03:51:34 PM »

Pussywillows have separate male and female trees separated by male flowering alluring bright yellow color, while the female flowers are unassuming greenish. In return, the female flowers are coveted honey.


So if you can try to plant the female pussywillow, or if you can find a kind that flower early, male or female.


mvh Edward  tongue
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edward
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« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2013, 03:54:35 PM »

 lau Hahahaha you cant write pussywillows as two words  lau





mvh Edward  tongue
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BlueBee
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« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2013, 04:19:51 PM »

Nope, radio edit.  grin

Interesting about the tree sexes Edward, I did not know that.  I think my pussywillows are salix discolor (native in Michigan and northern US).  I assume the Salix Caprea is what is commonly called a pussywillow in Europe? 

My willows are within 100 feet of my hives on a residential lot, and the bees have always been able to get pollen from them.  They are just covered with bees when in bloom.  My bees seem to ignore the other willows. 

Right now the Red Oaks are dripping in pollen, but I don't see a single bee going after it!
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edward
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« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2013, 04:56:19 PM »

http://www.bioresurs.uu.se/myller/skog/salg3.htm

A link to a pussywillow Picture with male and female flowers.

Translation Swedish to English

  Hane av sälg = male willow


 Hona av sälg = female willow  


mvh Edward  tongue
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edward
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« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2013, 05:02:33 PM »

There are a lot of farmers that grow willow as a energy crop here in sweden.

Farm and bee keeping organization are lobbying for that the farmers plant mostly female pussywillows beecause they are beneficial to many early pollinating insects, bees, bumble bee and butterfly's.



mvh Edward  tongue
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tincan
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« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2013, 09:57:43 PM »

thanks for the input I guess I just never thought about willows as a source of pollen there is 20 acres of it 40 yards from hives
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