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Author Topic: MAQS Treatment for Swarms  (Read 7256 times)
Jim 134
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« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2013, 03:54:58 PM »

IMHO Something to think about if you use Coumaphos for varroa mites.
 

On Saturday, March 2, 2013 I when to WCBA ALL DAY SPRING MEETING
(Worcester County Beekeepers Association In Massachusetts )
Dr. Jeff Pettis As research leader of the USDA-ARS Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville,
Dr. Jeff Pettis
Say Coumaphos will kill sperm inside the queen bees and you will get a drone lays or you may get a shotgun lays.


                   BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
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"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
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danno
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« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2013, 04:01:16 PM »

I didn't think anyone used Coumaphos for mite control in many years
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Jim 134
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« Reply #22 on: May 09, 2013, 04:49:32 PM »

This is from Brushy Mountain Bee Farm 5/9/12 4:45 PM
you: What is the Active ingredient in Check-Mite Huh

Jenee: Hello, how may I help you?

you: Hi

Jenee: let me check for you

you: OK

Jenee: Coumaphos; [0,0-Diethyl 0-(3-chloro-4methyl-2-oxo-@H-1-benzopyran-7-yl) Phosphorothioate]

Jenee: 10%

you: OK

Jenee: Is there anything else I can help you with

you: no CUL

Jenee: Have a great day.
 

"Still being used in some products for varroa mites"


                                        BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
        Chinese Proverb

"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
 John F. Kennedy
Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/
2Sox
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« Reply #23 on: May 09, 2013, 04:51:28 PM »

Always looking to have my cake and eat it too, has anyone found one to be superior to the other as far as killing mites inside and outside the brood with the least impact to the bee's?
The only one that kills under capping is formic MAQS

That's why I'm leaning towards MAQS as my primary.  But I understand that it's best to rotate treatments periodically - Hopguard, Apivar Life, etc.
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danno
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« Reply #24 on: May 09, 2013, 08:41:41 PM »

This is from Brushy Mountain Bee Farm 5/9/12 4:45 PM
you: What is the Active ingredient in Check-Mite Huh

Jenee: Hello, how may I help you?

you: Hi

Jenee: let me check for you

you: OK

Jenee: Coumaphos; [0,0-Diethyl 0-(3-chloro-4methyl-2-oxo-@H-1-benzopyran-7-yl) Phosphorothioate]

Jenee: 10%

you: OK

Jenee: Is there anything else I can help you with

you: no CUL

Jenee: Have a great day.
 

"Still being used in some products for varroa mites"


                                        BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
I really dont understand what your saying here?   I know whats in checkmite but as I said no has used it on mites for many years.  It is still used for SHB and IMHO  it is nasty stuff.   No one treats mites with it
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2Sox
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« Reply #25 on: May 09, 2013, 08:53:57 PM »

Coumophos??? Check Mite???   Where is this going?


This discussion is taking a detour into Never-Never-Land and it's not useful.  Let's get back on track.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2013, 09:34:08 PM by 2Sox » Logged

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Jim 134
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« Reply #26 on: May 09, 2013, 10:13:52 PM »

I had been treatment free up until last season.  I lost all sixteen of my colonies over the winter.  I made a post about this previously.  NO more treatment free.  It's like vaccinations: Either every bee colony in the world goes treatment free, sustains unspeakable losses and hopefully reaches balance with the invading pest. OR every colony in the world gets its vaccination until the pest is a thing of the past.  I don't have another answer.  This loss had demoralized me, but I'm coming back.

I'll be using MAQS on my full colonies in the fall. 

I think I'll make a new revised post: "What are the best mite treatments and best timing for newly collected swarms?"

IMHO this opened it up for all kinds of treatments on varroa mites. If I am wrong I do apologize.




                                  BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
        Chinese Proverb

"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
 John F. Kennedy
Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA. http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/
2Sox
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« Reply #27 on: May 09, 2013, 10:15:51 PM »

Jim,
I did start that other thread...
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melliferal
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« Reply #28 on: May 10, 2013, 01:54:35 AM »

I'm actually curious about what people have to say on this topic as well.
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« Reply #29 on: May 10, 2013, 02:04:53 AM »

I know I do not have the experience most people here have. What I lack in experience I more than make up for in common sense. I believe in the non-treatment to a point. I think it's important that bee's be allowed to develop resistances to diseases in their environment naturally.

What I don't agree with is the fanaticism by which some people would allow complete die outs to occur without any intervention. It's not practical, it's cruel, and it's expensive. I would be willing to try natural treatments and in severe cases, treatments like MAQ's, which have so far been proven not to be detrimental to the bees and their larvae.

Jeff 
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RHBee
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« Reply #30 on: May 10, 2013, 04:55:01 AM »

Read the directions for MAQ's. Temperature is very important. I used it last year, very effective, also killed a lot lot bees. I'm talking a pretty good pile in front of every colony. This year I'm going to use oxalic acid in both vapor and trickle. Vapor for mid summer knock down and trickle for fall broodless period. Oxalic acid occurs naturally in honey and many plants I don't see a down side to it. Finski's formula for the European trickle method is a sticky the vaporization method is well documented in this forum. I made a stainless steel pipe about 4ft long to deliver the vapor and plan to use a propane burner to get to the correct temp. A 1" shim used on top of the colony and a cloth to seal the entrance up.
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Ray
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« Reply #31 on: May 10, 2013, 06:19:15 AM »

Formic acid in MAQS also is found naturally in the hive. As always read the instructions. remove entrance reducers, if bees crowd heavily outside the hive, add an empty super to give them room to move around in the hive if needed.
 Ray, the broodless period most likely will be in the December timeframe. But it is important to treat before they start reaing the winter bees so they have a better chance of going into winter healthy.
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2Sox
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« Reply #32 on: May 10, 2013, 07:00:46 AM »

Formic acid in MAQS also is found naturally in the hive. As always read the instructions. remove entrance reducers, if bees crowd heavily outside the hive, add an empty super to give them room to move around in the hive if needed.
 Ray, the broodless period most likely will be in the December timeframe. But it is important to treat before they start reaing the winter bees so they have a better chance of going into winter healthy.

Are you saying to place an empty super on top of the boxes when treating with MAQS?  What would be the reason to do this?
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danno
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« Reply #33 on: May 10, 2013, 07:53:29 AM »

Formic acid in MAQS also is found naturally in the hive. As always read the instructions. remove entrance reducers, if bees crowd heavily outside the hive, add an empty super to give them room to move around in the hive if needed.
 Ray, the broodless period most likely will be in the December timeframe. But it is important to treat before they start rearing the winter bees so they have a better chance of going into winter healthy.

Are you saying to place an empty super on top of the boxes when treating with MAQS?  What would be the reason to do this?

Temp can be a real problem with MAQS.   To hot and it disperses the vapor to fast.   To consentrated vapor and bee's start dieing, bearding and could abscond.  A empty super just gives them more temporary space. 
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2Sox
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« Reply #34 on: May 10, 2013, 08:22:46 AM »

Formic acid in MAQS also is found naturally in the hive. As always read the instructions. remove entrance reducers, if bees crowd heavily outside the hive, add an empty super to give them room to move around in the hive if needed.
 Ray, the broodless period most likely will be in the December timeframe. But it is important to treat before they start rearing the winter bees so they have a better chance of going into winter healthy.

Are you saying to place an empty super on top of the boxes when treating with MAQS?  What would be the reason to do this?

Temp can be a real problem with MAQS.   To hot and it disperses the vapor to fast.   To consentrated vapor and bee's start dieing, bearding and could abscond.  A empty super just gives them more temporary space. 

Sounds like good advice.
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danno
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« Reply #35 on: May 10, 2013, 08:56:23 AM »

another natural treatment that has not been mentioned is thymol.  I have used apiguard a few times with good success.   
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« Reply #36 on: May 10, 2013, 09:42:03 AM »

Question: what are the negative aspects or consequences to using each of these products mentioned - Apiguard, Apivar, Mite-Away, and so forth?
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« Reply #37 on: May 10, 2013, 09:56:27 AM »

I believe in the non-treatment to a point. I think it's important that bee's be allowed to develop resistances to diseases in their environment naturally.

What I don't agree with is the fanaticism by which some people would allow complete die outs to occur without any intervention. It's not practical, it's cruel, and it's expensive. I would be willing to try natural treatments and in severe cases, treatments like MAQ's, which have so far been proven not to be detrimental to the bees and their larvae.

Seconded.  I do not believe in "preventative" treatment for my bees; I don't automatically medicate by calendar.  However, if the colony is obviously ill and suffering, and I can easily help with some non-toxic treatment or even a special hive component, it's not even a dilemma for me.
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« Reply #38 on: May 10, 2013, 10:03:01 AM »

that kills under capping is formic MAQS

so the advertiser says but it not true.

Recommended treatment time is 3 weeks = brood cycle.

And when you look efficacy in practice, it is not 96% allways. Often it is 70 or 80%.

Yo may find researches that acid kills under brood caps but why 3 week treatment is needed?
« Last Edit: May 10, 2013, 10:27:51 AM by Finski » Logged

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danno
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« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2013, 11:17:09 AM »

Miteaway pads that was replaced with the miteaway quick strips was a 21 day treatment.   The quick strips is a 7 day treatment.   All the rest are 21 days.
  melliferal   "if the colony is obviously ill and suffering"   By the time you start seeing "ill and suffering" you are to late. 
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