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Author Topic: Painted woodware sticks to other woodware  (Read 3436 times)
Bee Curious
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« on: May 05, 2013, 09:35:07 PM »

My first hive is ready and waiting for my bees next week.  It consists of boxes I bought and assembled and parts I built myself: telescoping cover, screened bottom board, stand.  I painted them in late March.  Two coats of primer and two coats of Benjamin Moore Mooreguard Low Lustre Acrylic "oops" paint.  The paint is dry but when I stack the pieces together, they stick to each other.  I've even had to use my hive tool to pry pieces apart. They sometimes take a little paint off the adjacent piece when I pry them apart.  I've put them out in the sun a few times (I'm storing them on my enclosed back porch) but they still stick. 

Is it the low lustre finish?  Any ideas?   huh
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AllenF
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« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2013, 09:40:55 PM »

Bees will glue everything together as soon as they are in those boxes.   Don't worry about the paint causing them to stick.   It just needs to cure a little longer. 
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Moots
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« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2013, 09:56:45 PM »

BC,
I think it's just a matter of being fully cured.  When I do stack my boxes after I think they're dry, I stagger them to minimize this problem...and yes, I've had the same issue.

However, you did say something that peeked my curiosity.  Why two coats of primer?  I've seen a number of folks mention that they do this, and it just seems counterintuative to me.  I "briefly" searched a few painting forums and aside from trying to enhance wood grain or cover a difficult to cover color, I couldn't find anyone that thought there was any advantage to doing it.
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Bee Curious
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« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2013, 10:14:27 PM »

Moots,
The only reason I did two coats is that the primer can said to--at least that's how I read it.  I'll have to check.

BC
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Moots
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« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2013, 10:18:04 PM »

Moots,
The only reason I did two coats is that the primer can said to--at least that's how I read it.  I'll have to check.

BC

Wow! That would be interesting...Don't know that I've ever even read what my can says...I'll have to check. 
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"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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tefer2
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« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2013, 10:25:41 PM »

Latex paint takes a month to fully dry.
Try rubbing some vaseline petroleum jelly on the edges.
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Simon
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« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2013, 10:32:17 PM »

A lot of the beekeepers here paint their boxes inside and out, generally with acrylic paint. Before I get flamed, most of the store bought boxes are made from radiata pine and then treated with copper naphthenate wood preserver to make them last a bit longer.  Radiata doesn't stand up to the outside environment very well at all without some treatment and I suppose the paint inside the boxes protects the bees from any ill effects of the copper naphthenate.  The acrylic (water based paint) doesn't worry them, but the boxes stick together until the paint is well cured.  This may take several weeks outside in the sun and rain and you have to keep the boxes apart while this happens or your paint job will be marred.  Like AllenF said, some missing paint from where the boxes touch isn't normally a problem.  If you are a bit impatient, after the paint has dried for a couple of days, you can smear a very light coat of vaseline/petroleum jelly around the top and bottom of the boxes where they touch and then they wont stick together.  Just be careful to use very, very little as the vaseline will make the boxes slip apart and your nice neat stack/hive will fall over really easy.  It will prevent the bee's propolis from sticking too.

On the primer point, some of the exterior acrylic paint is self priming (eg. Wattle Solagard here) and it sticks pretty well once it's cured.  I have painted a timber dinghy with it and the rocks have a hard time removing any paint from the bottom.  This type of paint is pretty thick (too thick generally) and so covers pretty well without any primer undercoat.   

Simon
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BlueBee
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« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2013, 03:23:11 AM »

I think it's just a matter of being fully cured. 

Nope.  Sounds like somebody doesn’t have much experience with paint. shocked

Bee Curious, the real problem is a technical paint term called "blocking".  The only way to really prevent this problem is with oil based enamel.  Over time the blocking problems with your latex finish will subside to some degree, but will probably never go away.  http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/for-your-home/interior-painting-problems-paint-blocking-or-sticking-causes
 
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gjd
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« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2013, 07:16:22 AM »

From the supplied link telling you curing wasn't the cause:
What Causes Paint Blocking, or Sticking?

    Blocking can occur when insufficient time is allowed for the paint to cure before closing doors or windows.
    Using low-quality semi-gloss or gloss paints can also lead to blocking.

BM is good paint.  I'm not sure if this contributes a lot to the sticking issue, but I find that when I paint with exterior paint (beehives and outside window sashes) in my small basement, it takes a long time to dry.  Stuff outside with the same paint dries much faster.  My paint store guy says it's ventilation & vapor pressure or some such because the exterior paint I use (BM) is formulated for outside.  Seemed implausible to me, but the effect is consistent. 
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hardwood
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« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2013, 08:22:03 AM »

I rub the edges with wax.

Scott
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Jim 134
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« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2013, 08:31:37 AM »

I rub the edges with wax.

Scott

Scott..
Bee Wax  evil


                       BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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Moots
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« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2013, 08:46:27 AM »

I think it's just a matter of being fully cured.

Nope.  Sounds like somebody doesn’t have much experience with paint. shocked

Bee Curious, the real problem is a technical paint term called "blocking".  The only way to really prevent this problem is with oil based enamel.  Over time the blocking problems with your latex finish will subside to some degree, but will probably never go away.  http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/for-your-home/interior-painting-problems-paint-blocking-or-sticking-causes
  



First, obviously it was a typo on my part, I meant, a matter of it NOT being fully cured.  Anyone with the IQ of a small appliance light bulb probably is capable of realizing that is what I meant.

Knowing you're a fart smella, Oops! I mean smart fella!  grin I'm sure you also realized that ...

lau But thanks for coming to the rescue BlueBee...God knows you're an authority on EVERYTHING!  grin

Now as gjd pointed out, the linked article you supplied states the following...

Sticking doors and windows are often due to a paint adhesion problem called blocking. Paint sticking to itself upon contact is typically caused by paint not drying properly.
What Causes Paint Blocking, or Sticking?

Blocking can occur when insufficient time is allowed for the paint to cure before closing doors or windows
Using low-quality semi-gloss or gloss paints can also lead to blocking


So, help me out...other than your desire to go through life garnering the same attention and admiration as a pimple on someone's rear end, what "exactly" is your problem with my statement?...Trying to blast folks over obvious typos!  Really Blue....Is that what you're been reduced to stooping to?
Sort of funny actually, kind of smacks of desperation.  laugh
« Last Edit: May 06, 2013, 09:10:16 AM by Moots » Logged

"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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danno
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« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2013, 07:52:51 AM »

Hey Moots
Its Fart Smeller and  Smart Feller.   Sorry carry on.  This is getting good
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Moots
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« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2013, 07:58:21 AM »

Hey Moots
Its Fart Smeller and  Smart Feller.   Sorry carry on.  This is getting good

Po-tate-o - Po-tat-o  grin
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"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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BlueBee
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« Reply #14 on: May 07, 2013, 09:28:42 AM »

I guess if you don’t know beans about paint, you can always join a spelling bee  Wink
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Moots
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« Reply #15 on: May 07, 2013, 09:50:21 AM »

I guess if you don’t know beans about paint, you can always join a spelling bee  Wink

And yet, he continues to grasp at straws....  grin

How do I just know that Bluebee was the kid that constantly sat around and poked at ant mounds with a stick whenever he wasn't busy throwing rocks at wasp nest. lau
Which I guess is pretty normal behavior for most little boys.  However, Blue has managed to never grow up.  Somehow, he still manages to equate pleasure in his life by how much he's able to aggravate and agitate others.  laugh

Hate to be the one to break it to you Blue, but you're losing your touch.  Part of being a successful forum instigator, aggravator and all around antagonist is not being so blatantly obvious about what you're trying to do....As they say, you're telegraphing your punches.  grin
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"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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danno
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« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2013, 10:04:52 AM »

Bee Curious
I dont paint the top or bottom edges.   The bee's will pretty much seal these edges. 
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Moots
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« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2013, 10:15:46 AM »

Bee Curious
I dont paint the top or bottom edges.   The bee's will pretty much seal these edges. 

Danno,
Thanks for getting us back to the OP.

Bee Curious,
My apologies for hijacking your thread with Blue and his foolishness...

Anyway, I paint both my top and bottom edges and try to allow a few days dry time before stacking them.  As I mentioned, when I do stack them, I stagger them, giving only 4 small contact points.  On occasion when they do stick and possibly pull off some paint, you've still got about 95% coverage that you wouldn't have had otherwise.  Not sure why yours are taking so long to dry, maybe throw a fan in the mix, I'm thinking the increased air movement would have to help.

Good Luck!  Smiley
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"We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions."
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Jim 134
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« Reply #18 on: May 07, 2013, 10:49:02 AM »

 "Painted woodware sticks to other woodware"

Looks like a other reason to keep on using linseed oil. rolleyes




                  BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
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Georgia Boy
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« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2013, 10:43:55 PM »

Or you could just dip them in wax. I think I read that Michael does that.

David
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