Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: Swarm Mite Treatments  (Read 426 times)

Offline 2Sox

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 169
  • Gender: Male
Swarm Mite Treatments
« on: May 08, 2013, 09:51:21 AM »
What is the best mite treatment and best timing for newly collected swarms?
"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism

Offline Michael Bush

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 14159
  • Gender: Male
    • bushfarms.com
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2013, 09:54:47 AM »
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline 2Sox

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 169
  • Gender: Male
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2013, 10:03:11 AM »
My choice would be "none"...

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoursimplesteps.htm

Michael,
I've read and studied your site and respect your knowledge a very great deal, but I tried not treating and I lost all sixteen of my colonies this past winter.  I said this in another post, It's like vaccinations: Either every bee colony in the world goes treatment free, sustains unspeakable losses and hopefully reaches balance with the invading pest. OR every colony in the world gets its "vaccinations" until the pest is a thing of the past.  I don't have another answer.  This loss had demoralized me, but I'm coming back.
"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism

Offline Michael Bush

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 14159
  • Gender: Male
    • bushfarms.com
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2013, 11:08:09 AM »
> but I tried not treating and I lost all sixteen of my colonies this past winter.

Are you on large cell foundation?  It was a hard winter for losses (there is another thread with the percentages) for everyone.  I never succeeded in keeping them alive with large cell foundation after Varroa showed up.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline sterling

  • Queen Bee
  • ****
  • Posts: 1097
  • Gender: Male
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2013, 11:17:47 AM »
My choice would be "none"...

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoursimplesteps.htm

Michael,
I've read and studied your site and respect your knowledge a very great deal, but I tried not treating and I lost all sixteen of my colonies this past winter.  I said this in another post, It's like vaccinations: Either every bee colony in the world goes treatment free, sustains unspeakable losses and hopefully reaches balance with the invading pest. OR every colony in the world gets its "vaccinations" until the pest is a thing of the past.  I don't have another answer.  This loss had demoralized me, but I'm coming back.

So the people who treat with chemicals do not loose hives. :?

Offline 2Sox

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 169
  • Gender: Male
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2013, 11:32:53 AM »
Are you on large cell foundation?  It was a hard winter for losses (there is another thread with the percentages) for everyone.  I never succeeded in keeping them alive with large cell foundation after Varroa showed up.
All foundationless.  Let the bees build what they will.  I've read some research on both sides of the cell size debate and from my knowledge the findings are all inconclusive.  Jennifer Berry has done a good deal of research on this. I don't put too much credence on small cell. It is my understanding the data is more anecdotal than scientific.   
"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism

Offline 2Sox

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 169
  • Gender: Male
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2013, 11:34:39 AM »
My choice would be "none"...

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoursimplesteps.htm

Michael,
I've read and studied your site and respect your knowledge a very great deal, but I tried not treating and I lost all sixteen of my colonies this past winter.  I said this in another post, It's like vaccinations: Either every bee colony in the world goes treatment free, sustains unspeakable losses and hopefully reaches balance with the invading pest. OR every colony in the world gets its "vaccinations" until the pest is a thing of the past.  I don't have another answer.  This loss had demoralized me, but I'm coming back.

So the people who treat with chemicals do not loose hives. :?

That would be nice, wouldn't it?
"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism

Offline 2Sox

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 169
  • Gender: Male
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2013, 11:35:38 AM »
Michael,

Would you like to comment on my vaccination analogy?
"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism

Offline Michael Bush

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 14159
  • Gender: Male
    • bushfarms.com
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2013, 12:10:29 PM »
>So the people who treat with chemicals do not loose hives.

Of course they do.

>Would you like to comment on my vaccination analogy?

Insects are not people.  Propping up inadequate genetics is not good for the species.  It's probably not good for the human species either, but we have a different set of morals at work with people.  We are not purposefully breeding humans for health and productivity, we allow people their individual freedom to choose such things.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Online kathyp

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 15408
  • Gender: Female
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2013, 12:36:35 PM »
i am not opposed to mite treatment, but there is no reason to treat a swarm.  there is a natural brood break, so there is a natural break in the mite cycle.

whether or not you need to treat that colony later depends on what you find and your desires. 



Quote
but I tried not treating and I lost all sixteen of my colonies this past winter.


what makes you think it was mites?  may have been, but to lose all seems a bit odd.  what was your mite count before winter?
.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville

Offline 2Sox

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 169
  • Gender: Male
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2013, 12:49:05 PM »
>So the people who treat with chemicals do not loose hives.

Of course they do.

>Would you like to comment on my vaccination analogy?

Insects are not people.  Propping up inadequate genetics is not good for the species.  It's probably not good for the human species either, but we have a different set of morals at work with people.  We are not purposefully breeding humans for health and productivity, we allow people their individual freedom to choose such things.


Thank you, Michael.  Logical comments and interesting point of view. Obviously, there are many factors at play.  As I said, it was an analogy.
"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism

Offline 2Sox

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 169
  • Gender: Male
Re: Swarm Mite Treatments
« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2013, 12:51:00 PM »
i am not opposed to mite treatment, but there is no reason to treat a swarm.  there is a natural brood break, so there is a natural break in the mite cycle.

Thanks, Kathy.  Point well taken.
"Good will is the desire to have something else stronger and more beautiful for this desire makes oneself stronger and more beautiful." - Eli Siegel, American educator, poet, founder of Aesthetic Realism

 

anything