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Author Topic: Why not try small cell II  (Read 9511 times)

Offline edward

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Re: Why not try small cell II
« Reply #40 on: August 27, 2013, 10:28:32 AM »
Average winter losses are under 50%

I wouldn't bee content with that result seems too high when there is alternatives.

How would people react if a farmer lost 50% of his cows every year?

mvh Edward  :-P

Offline T Beek

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Re: Why not try small cell II
« Reply #41 on: August 27, 2013, 11:11:53 AM »
Edward; Good for you, not to be content with my results or anyone elses.  You know what?  We can all tell  :-D, that you're not content. Your avatar tells us as much. But I wasn't asking for your advise.  You know that, right?  It is obvious that you don't bother to read other beeks posts as you missed my 100% survival rate (2011-12) and 'focused' instead on my "under" 50% losses.  Go figure. 

To be more precise; Survivor 'averages' at my place hover around 60-70% but chances are you won't read this far to learn that.

"difrnt' strokes for difrnt' folks" 

I'm certain you've heard that one before, right?  I really don't want to get off on the bad foot, as opposed to JB's "good foot"  8-)............. BUT................

What truth are 'you' seeking 'this time' Edward?  Your own, right?  Isn't that what we all do?  OK, some more than others  ;)

Are you adding to the conversation or scaring others away?

Are you always this confrontational with people, or just when typing at the computer?  Honestly, your posts speak for themselves. 

I've been back on BeeMaster for just a few days after a very busy Spring/summer and "the attacks you've laid upon others over mostly nothing" is troubling to say the least.  I guess we'll have to wait and see if you now complain to the mods for me calling you out on your denigrating methods, heh?

Gonna have to ignore you from now on, Dude  :-D  You'll get no more feedback (reverse drama?) from me.  Have a good life.

XIN LOI 
"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."

Offline edward

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Re: Why not try small cell II
« Reply #42 on: August 27, 2013, 04:12:39 PM »
It is obvious that you don't bother to read other beeks posts as you missed my 100% survival rate (2011-12) and 'focused' instead on my "under" 50% losses.  Go figure. 

To be more precise; Survivor 'averages' at my place hover around 60-70% but chances are you won't read this far to learn that.
No treatments since 2007, no (well, rarely) foundation since 2009.  Average winter losses are under 50% (2011-12 saw a 100% survivor rate, a first!).

If you write "Average winter losses are under 50%" I will naturally assume you mean "your average Winter losses", inclusive the good years.

OK so you revised your survival rates to 60-70% Even this is to low (in my opinion) 90% is average and 95% is good, anything under 85% I consider as a failure and if I was not preforming over that level I would have to take a closer look at the way I keep bees and make a change.

I was not looking for a confrontation, just a bit startled and surprised of the numbers

mvh Edward  :-P

Offline edward

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Re: Why not try small cell II
« Reply #43 on: August 27, 2013, 04:16:41 PM »
How are the rest of those that use small cells doing in there Winter survival rates?

What rates do you Think are normal and acceptable?


mvh Edward  :-P

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Why not try small cell II
« Reply #44 on: August 27, 2013, 11:03:42 PM »
>How are the rest of those that use small cells doing in there Winter survival rates?

Winter survival is not just about mites.  The climate is different every winter.  Really long winters take their toll.  Bitterly cold winters take their toll.  Mild winters have very high success.  Good fall flows lead to good wintering.  No fall flows lead to poor wintering without some pollen in the fall.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline OldMech

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Re: Why not try small cell II
« Reply #45 on: November 12, 2013, 12:14:32 PM »


 hmm...   17 hives going in.. 14 coming out...

   Two hives lost were southern VSH queens..   BOOMING going into fall..  wintered like the rest of the hives.. early march they were dead.. stuffed into the cells inches from honey... not happy about it.. one hive was weak. did not build up well from a feral swarm.. tried to overwinter them anyhow, and it didnt work.   I have a similar hive going into this winter.. late June cut out that just never took off. I HOPE they make it and build up well in the spring.. I like the survivor stock and try to proliferate from them.   

  Mostly natural cell, some PF 120's. I have four hives left still on rite cell.   Mite counts in those hives ARE higher than in the other hives.. BUT.. the bees in the rite cell hives are Italians and Carnys commercially acquired, and they sit about 130 yards from the other hives.   Regression starting on them if they make THIS winter
   I did NOT treat the feral hives, I DID treat the rite cell hives (Hopguard only)
   So... not sure what that means as far as percentage..    Will know a lot more once I get the number of hives built up. I will be separating them to different yards, and working the yard about 4 miles away toward pure survivors with no treatments at all. I also intend to buy VSH (northern) if I can find them to add to that yard..

   Weather natural cell, or small cell works doesnt really matter. I am hoping it helps, but the fact is, I build my own frames, and use all mediums so it is cheaper and easier for me to go that route. if there is some small "aid" in varoa control somewhere in there, so much the better.  It is my goal to eventually be treatment free on all hives.. first, for better hardier bees, second, to save me work and money..   If I live to be 70 (20 years from now) I hope to still be using the genetics I pull out of this yard in the next few years.

 While I do not strictly adhere to any philosophy other than my own.. I agree with Mr. Bush that we will NOT get better bees until we stop treating...
   Having said that... there ARE times that you KNOW you have to treat if you want to keep hives alive...   It is easier to treat, and keep a strong hive that I can requeen with a survivor than it is to start a hive from scratch...   If I find that a hive is being overwhelmed, and the signs point toward the end, I prefer to treat to save it, and try a different queen later. Eventually it will all come together.
39 Hives and growing.  Havent found the end of the comfort zone yet.

 

anything