Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: New Queen to Queenless hive?  (Read 720 times)

Offline dprater

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 139
New Queen to Queenless hive?
« on: May 03, 2013, 06:01:54 AM »
I have a hive that is Queenless as far as I know. It still has lots of bees 3 mediums brood chamber one medium with honey. It swarmed April 17th. I went in yesterday and found no brood and no eggs at all not even drone. I took a queen for one of my nucs, caged her with a marshmellow in the hole and added her to the hive.
Question: if there is a unmated Queen in the hive will she or hive bees kill my new Queen when she gets out? Should I look for the unmated Queen? How long before thay will eat through the marshmellow?  I can look for the unmated Q with I get home from work if I need to. First time to do this I just dont know.

Thanks
Danny

Offline hardwood

  • Galactic Bee
  • ******
  • Posts: 3482
  • Gender: Male
  • Alysian Apiaries youtube.com/MrBeedude
Re: New Queen to Queenless hive?
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2013, 11:14:24 AM »
You shouldn't find signs of a new queen in there for about another week...I always wait a month after a swarm to check.

Scott
"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907

Offline Michael Bush

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 14876
  • Gender: Male
    • bushfarms.com
Re: New Queen to Queenless hive?
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2013, 01:30:21 PM »
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline dprater

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 139
Re: New Queen to Queenless hive?
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2013, 07:03:20 AM »
Well it shows I'm new at this and looks like I jumped the gun on this one. I guess I need to slow down on my quick decisions in the bees. Would you take the Queen back out (if she is not out of the cage) and but her back in the nuc?

Thanks much for the info.
Danny

Offline dprater

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 139
Re: New Queen to Queenless hive?
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2013, 03:03:14 PM »
Checked and she is out the cage. Reminded my self I just having fun with this bee keeping thing and my lively hood does not depend on the outcome. Good thing :).

Danny

Offline cdray

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 140
  • Gender: Male
    • Find me on Facebook
Re: New Queen to Queenless hive?
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2013, 03:41:26 PM »
I have only been keeping bees a year but I have learned a lot in that time.  People can tell you, books can be read and videos can be watched but  nothing substitutes for hands on experience and me learning from from my own mistakes..Keep on keepin' on.  David

Offline Michael Bush

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 14876
  • Gender: Male
    • bushfarms.com
Re: New Queen to Queenless hive?
« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2013, 09:51:53 AM »
>Question: if there is a unmated Queen in the hive will she or hive bees kill my new Queen when she gets out?

Probably BEFORE she gets out...

> Should I look for the unmated Queen?

It's doubtful you can find her.

> How long before thay will eat through the marshmellow?

An hour.  Maybe a day.

> I can look for the unmated Q with I get home from work if I need to. First time to do this I just dont know.

The best solution is always a frame of open brood and eggs, not a queen.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beespanacea.htm

Not only is it foolproof and doesn't require you to know the state of the hive precisely, it gets you a locally mated queen...
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

 

anything