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Author Topic: Hive survived winter  (Read 445 times)

Offline Dange

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Hive survived winter
« on: April 30, 2013, 05:54:46 PM »
this is my first year having a hive survive the winter.  I had wintered them over in 2 deeps.  When i checked them this past weekend there was only about 4 frames of bees with queen and eggs larva. Everything looks great.  I was wondering tho should i remove the lower deep where they are not at or just switch the deeps and leave both deeps on?  The weather when its not raining here has been bee friendly.  Thanks for the advice.

Offline Joe D

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Re: Hive survived winter
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2013, 07:48:05 PM »
I don't know where your area is with spring.  Down here we have been having swarms for a couple of months or so.  Some of our flow has been going and the privet hedge is starting to bloom now.  That said I would probably leave them in the two deeps.  If you have a flow going they will be filling things, if your flow isn't going good yet I would see if they would take some sugar syrup.  To build their numbers for the flow.  This is just my opinion.  Good luck to you and your bees.



Joe

Offline don2

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Re: Hive survived winter
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2013, 07:59:56 PM »
I would switch the boxes. If there is not a lot of warm weather yet, 60/70, close up about 3/4th of the entrance till it warms up more or till they get built up. Offer some sugar syrup, if they don't need it nothing lost. mho.  :)d2

Offline Dange

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Re: Hive survived winter
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2013, 08:13:31 PM »
Thanks. I have the entrance reduced. I don't think I am going to feed syrup due to the fact that there is almost ten frames combined within the two deeps. A lot of the bees died out during the winter I think mainly due to the mouse nest that was in there. I removed it and the frames. I also made a slotted wood piece to prevent this. I was surprised by how many bees didn't make it thru the winter tho. Thanks again for the advise.

Offline BlueBee

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Re: Hive survived winter
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2013, 11:15:53 PM »
I would remove the empty bottom deep if you only have 4 frames of bees.  No point in making the bees heat a much bigger house than they need.  Although the larger surface area of a 2 deep setup would capture more solar heat (on those 1 or 2 days of sun we’ve been getting).  This spring has been something else, more like an extended March.  Let’s hope the real spring has finally arrived.  Been nice the past few days.

Joe D, our trees don’t even have leaves yet.  Not even a sign of dandelions yet.

I wouldn’t feed, there are enough sources to sustain them even now.  Once spring really kicks in, we’ll have plenty of nectar for the bees.

Congratulations on surviving winter, the bees too.  :)

Offline Joe D

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Re: Hive survived winter
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2013, 12:44:00 AM »
Blue, our Laurel Cherrys, Redbud have been gone, and most of blackberry,and Huckleberry, and fruit trees.  Crimson and White Clover is finishing now, and the privet hedge is getting started.  Red top hedge has been blooming for a few weeks.




Joe

Offline Finski

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Re: Hive survived winter
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2013, 02:10:20 AM »
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Take another box off.
Then make a dummy board that you reduce the bee room to 4 frames.
When new bees start to emerge, move the wall and add a frame.

4 frame colony is slow to grow. All they need is warm hive.

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Offline RHBee

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Re: Hive survived winter
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2013, 08:18:03 AM »
First Congrats. I really feel for you guys up there in the cold north. It is a real challenge just getting your bees to survive the harsh cold winter.
Even down here I would reduce the area that the bees occupy. Finski and BlueBee know northern survival techniques read and learn. Much good fortune to you.
Later,
Ray