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Author Topic: Deeps to Mediums  (Read 450 times)
Steel Tiger
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« on: April 28, 2013, 11:53:53 AM »

 Picking up two nucs on the 1st. I'm planning on using all mediums but the nuc are 5 frame deep size. The seller is selling the frames and the colony, not the nuc boxes, so I have to show up with 2 deeps with a bottom board stapled on each. Pickup time is 6 pm, then it's a 3 hour drive home.
 I want to avoid cutting brood comb. So to get them moved into mediums, I'm going to build a 5 frame spacer to put in the deep. It'll just be a box the same dimensions of a deep body frame with overhangs to rest in the frame rest. I'll then set the deep on top of a medium with empty frames. That should force the bees to build downward and after filling the first medium, I'll place a second medium on the bottom for more expansion.
 Eventually, the deep will be empty of brood and perhaps starting to be used to store honey. At that point, I can remove the deep and replace it with another medium. Comb can be cut from the deep frames and placed into medium frames and perhaps swapped with any empty frames in the brood area or checkered board into another medium on top if the bottom medium frames all have drawn comb.
 Is there any reason why this shouldn't work?
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Finski
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« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2013, 12:11:13 PM »

.
Let  the bees build  up in deep frames and when deep box is full, the use mediums.
Important is that colony grows in peace during its early  period.


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Intheswamp
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« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2013, 12:52:18 AM »

ST, you might want to get a couple of good ratchet straps to hold everything together.  When I'm hiving a swarm I like the bottom board stapled to the bottom box, but I might stack another box on top of that one along with the cover...the ratchet strap makes me feel more confident that everything will stay to gather while traveling.  

Also, a piece of #8 mesh screen 3-4 inches wide by ever how wide your entrance is is good to block the entrance.  Fold it in half the long way and push the folded edge into the entrance.  The tension and friction fit should hold it it place but you can put a staple in it a couple of places for insurance.  Also, an inner cover with #8 screen over the hold would give them more ventilation.  It is surprising how much heat they can put off.

If you have to end up cutting the comb and installing it into medium frames it really isn't a big deal.  The cut out pieces would fit nicely being as the shape is already squared off and one dimension is the correct size...it would not be nearly as difficult as doing a cut out from a wall or something.   I would use two medium boxes to do the cutout...cut a piece from one of the deep frames big enough to fill a medium frame and install that frame in the lower box then put the remaining piece of comb from that deep frame in another medium frame but install that frame in the top box positioned directly above it's original lower part.  That way the comb still has the same configuration but in two frames.  You most likely will have 2-3 frames per nuc of brood comb to deal with if you decide to do a cut out....not all five frames....but, maybe you will. Smiley

Best wishes, seal them good, don't let them get hot, and............HAVE FUN!!!!! Wink
Ed
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fshrgy99
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2013, 07:08:45 AM »

Hi Steeltiger,

IMO what intheswamp said about "don't get them hot" especially if you've got a bottom board stapled on and there's little ventilation

Take a spray bottle so you can mist them if you think they're getting stressed from heat. Evaporative cooling will help a lot (I head they bring water into the hive when it gets hot in the summer for the same reason)

Although I've decided to switch to mediums for lifting honey I'm leaving my deeps as brood chambers for now. Seems like I've more than enough to do without moving them and I think they'll winter better in deeps.

Good luck with the delivery!

Dennis
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Steel Tiger
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« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2013, 07:51:03 AM »

ST, you might want to get a couple of good ratchet straps to hold everything together.  When I'm hiving a swarm I like the bottom board stapled to the bottom box, but I might stack another box on top of that one along with the cover...the ratchet strap makes me feel more confident that everything will stay to gather while traveling.  
I have plenty of ratchet straps. 1 to wrap around each, 1 to hold them down and 1 to keep them from sliding.
Also, a piece of #8 mesh screen 3-4 inches wide by ever how wide your entrance is is good to block the entrance.  Fold it in half the long way and push the folded edge into the entrance.  The tension and friction fit should hold it it place but you can put a staple in it a couple of places for insurance.  Also, an inner cover with #8 screen over the hold would give them more ventilation.  It is surprising how much heat they can put off.
I have SBB that I was going to close up. I figure there will be enough cracks to keep them ventilated. I was going to tack on the entrance reducer and plug it with grass and a piece of tape. I'm glad you reminded me, I didn't think about the inner cover, I'll tack a piece of screen on that as well.
 The hives are going to be in the back of a pick up, at night, with temps around 40-50, traveling at 65 mph. I'm hoping that any air that gets in, isn't going to be too much for them.
If you have to end up cutting the comb and installing it into medium frames it really isn't a big deal.  The cut out pieces would fit nicely being as the shape is already squared off and one dimension is the correct size...it would not be nearly as difficult as doing a cut out from a wall or something.   I would use two medium boxes to do the cutout...cut a piece from one of the deep frames big enough to fill a medium frame and install that frame in the lower box then put the remaining piece of comb from that deep frame in another medium frame but install that frame in the top box positioned directly above it's original lower part.  That way the comb still has the same configuration but in two frames.  You most likely will have 2-3 frames per nuc of brood comb to deal with if you decide to do a cut out....not all five frames....but, maybe you will. Smiley
I really don't want to cut the comb and lose any brood, but that may turn out to be the best thing to do. It'll set them back on building new comb while the repair but it'll be 10 frames in the mediums that'll be filled faster.
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2013, 08:49:14 AM »

Be sure that where you place them in the bed of the truck doesn't have a "hot spot" from the exhaust pipe.  There's probably not an issue with that, but just sayin'...

As for temperature, I can't remember where you are located at....your still "hopelessly lost".  Kentucky?  A piece of foam slipped beneath the porch blocking a portion of that opening would cut down on ventilation but unless it's really cold (night time traveling) you would probably be ok without it.

As for cutting the comb, the bees will repair it fairly quickly.  Just take your time and do a neat job with the comb sitting straight in the frames making sure you keep them in the original vertical orientation (cells angled slightly upwards).  Still, that's your call to make on whether you do it.  Welcome to the world of beekeeping! Wink

Best wishes,
Ed

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www.beeweather.com 
American blood spilled to protect the freedom and peace of people all over the world.  320,000 USA casualties in WWI, 1,076,000 USA casualties in WWII, 128,000 USA casualties in the Korean War, 211,000 casualties in the Vietnam "conflict", 57,000 USA casualties in "War on Terror".  Benghazi, Libya, 13 USA casualties. These figures don't include 70,000 MIA.  But, the leaders of one political party of the United States of America continue to make the statement..."What difference does it make?".

"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev

"Always go to other people’s funerals, otherwise they wont come to yours." - Yogi Berra
10framer
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« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2013, 08:57:12 AM »

people haul thousands of hives across country on the backs of semis without worrying about over heating.  if you're hauling them at night, in a pick up and temperatures in the 40's doesn't it stand to reason that the 60 mile per hour 40 degree air son't heat them up?  when i move bees i staple the parts together on all sides and duct tap the top on shove some pine straw in the entrance and go.  i've moved a lot of bees in my life and other than the brief time we did a little migratory pollination i've never lost a hive due to the move.  secure close the entrance with something that will allow a little ventilation (screen, straw, etc) and don't hang any hair pin turns at 90 milers per hour and you should be ok.
if you're moving bees at night with temperatures in the 40's other than the motion and the wind what condition is any different than it would have been if they were sitting on a stand?  chilling is a much greater risk under those conditions.
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WarPonyFarms
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« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2013, 05:51:59 PM »

I had pretty good success picking up in two mediums.  I then put medium frames in the center of the deeps on both box levels, pushing the deeps to the outside until I was left with only the mediums.  They filled the empty frames very quickly because they didn't want the extra space in the brood area. (Thank-you MB)

I've also cut down and used the smaller section as a starter strip with great success.  If you're going all mediums, this would keep you from wasting the drawn comb.  Great luck to you however you decide.
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