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Author Topic: New Hive What to Expect?  (Read 372 times)
Georgia Boy
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« on: April 23, 2013, 09:47:20 PM »

It has been 3 days since I install my new pkg of bees in their hive. Was going to check and see if the queen had been released today but didn't get home in time. Did pop the top and make sure the feed had sugar water in it which it did and the bees were feeding. A good sign I take it. Smiley

I was watching the bees come and go didn't see any pollen coming in yet. Did see bees exchanging something mouth to mouth have no idea what that could have been. Water or nectar maybe?Huh

Anyhow I would really like to know what goes on in a new hive. I know they should be building comb since there wasn't any. I know they have been housekeeping. I feel so sorry for the bees trying to fly off with their dead. Kind of sad. Have the time the dead is too heavy and they both fall to the ground but the live bee still keeps trying to fly off with the dead bee.  Very determined. Really have to admire that.

Is there a book that will detail what order bee set up a new hive in? Would really love to read it.

Please direct me if you can. Have tried searching but to no avail.

Thanks

David

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Nonprophet
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« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2013, 11:06:08 PM »

Hey David,

I'm brand new too, just installed my first package ever last a week ago Friday. I've been wondering if the girls are foraging or not too as well have quite a bit in bloom right now. I tried watching them come and go, and I couldn't really see any pollen on their legs. I was a little worried, so, I grabbed a set of binoculars and sat down in a camp chair about 10' from the hive which allowed me to see them well without bothering them. What I found out by using the binos is that 3/4's of the returning bees had pollen on their legs--I just wasn't able to see it.

NP
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"The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little."
—Franklin D. Roosevelt
Georgia Boy
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« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2013, 11:21:54 PM »

To: Nonprophet

When you started the hive did you already have foundation drawn?  Did you use plastic, wax or did you go foundationless frames?

Since I installed a package and didn't have drawn comb for them I am using plastic foundation for them to draw. I will go foundationless in the next super I put on.

Tomorrow I will check to see if the queen has been released.

I will be getting 3 nucs within the next few weeks. I think I will like them better since they will be a functioning 5 frame hive. I will just need to add 3 more frames to it.

Didn't really like the pkg deal. Mine had a lot of dead bees in the bottom. Hope thats not a set back.

Our temps have been in the 60's and 70's for highs. But at night it is still chilly. Lows in the upper 30's to 40's.

We have everything in bloom. As a matter of fact my garden in up already.

Thanks for you reply.

Just worried a little. Want to do right by the girls.

One more thing. Did your pkg have drones in it. Mine did. Didn't realize just how much bigger the drones are than the girls. Louder to.

Thanks David
« Last Edit: April 24, 2013, 12:09:48 AM by Georgia Boy » Logged

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capt44
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« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2013, 11:26:10 PM »

A good book to have around for a reference is    'Bee Keeping for Dummies'
I have one here for a reference when I have a problem arise.
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Richard Vardaman (capt44)
Caelansbees
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« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2013, 11:33:54 PM »

Mike bush's practical beekeeper is golden.  Site is fantastic but I like a hard copy too and to support the man for as many questions as he answers us all.
George Imirie's pink papers are a trip to read.
The "dummies" book is good. I'm also a fan of long lane honey bee farms site.

NOTHING WILL BEAT A HANDFUL OF MENTORS!
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Caelansbees
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2013, 11:39:39 PM »

Also Keith Delplane did a video series that is now on YouTube that walks you thru what to expect the first year. There are some great videos up there.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=plpp&v=UjrdwXXEtLo

That's the first in that series thou.

Good luck.

Oh and binoculars? Move that lawn chair up and watch them.  They will be cool if you just hang out.
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Joe D
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« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2013, 11:58:07 PM »

When you are looking here and there and You run across something that you think you need to know start a file or put it on your favorites list.  I have Micheal and several other on my list.  When you get to wandering about something then you can just look down your list first.  
David I would think they should bee working on building comb, and maybe starting to fill it.  As for the watching once in a while they may get fussy, but most of the time they want care if you are there.
The ones I caught Sunday were a little Monday but were fine today.  Stood within arms length of hive and watched to come and go.  And on your temps, low last nite was 58 and high today 81 here.   Good luck to Y'all.


Joe
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Nonprophet
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« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2013, 12:03:43 AM »

To: Nonprophet

When you started the hive did you already have foundation drawn?  Did you use plastic, wax or did you go foundationless frames?

I'm using new wooden frames with new Pierco wax-coated plastic foundation. In the 10 days since I installed them, they have 5 frames about 2/3's drawn out. I think (though I don't know!) that's pretty good progress. There's 9 frames in there now and the frame feeder--they are drawing out comb on all the frames--just seem more focused in the inner frames right now.

Quote
One more thing. Did your pke have drones in it. Mind did. Didn't realize just how much bigger the drones are than the girls. Louder to.

Thanks David

Yes, I have some drones. Not a ton, but some.

NP
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"The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little."
—Franklin D. Roosevelt
Finski
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« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2013, 06:07:03 AM »

.
after 4 weeks you see there new bees, and after that the hive starts to expand.

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