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Author Topic: Getting ready for Varroa.  (Read 2484 times)
Wonga
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The budget should be balanced, the Treasury refill


« on: April 22, 2013, 01:08:51 AM »

I have been reading a bit about Varroa. Amongst other things, apparently both Coriander and Lavender are disliked by Varroa mites, so it's good to have them growing around your hives, and have plenty around for your bees to harvest when flowering. Anybody heard of any other aromatic plants varroa mites might not like?

Plus, what exactly are "hygienic" queens?

Cheers, Wonga
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rawfind
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« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2013, 02:41:14 AM »

I have been reading a bit about Varroa. Amongst other things, apparently both Coriander and Lavender are disliked by Varroa mites, so it's good to have them growing around your hives, and have plenty around for your bees to harvest when flowering. Anybody heard of any other aromatic plants varroa mites might not like?

Plus, what exactly are "hygienic" queens?

Cheers, Wonga
Well on the way in that case! and just planted a rosemary hedge for the girls
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tefer2
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« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2013, 08:32:15 AM »

Hygienic queens produce hygienic bees that uncap and remove varroa infested larvae.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2013, 08:42:23 AM »

When Varroa showed up in South Africa the beekeepers all agreed to do nothing.  They were out of the woods as far as Varroa issues within a couple of years.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Wonga
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The budget should be balanced, the Treasury refill


« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2013, 08:36:47 PM »

Michael,
I sort of figured that was the default position, but I want to help my hives as much as I can, without resorting to "heroic" measures. I mean,healthy, happy hives, with minimum interference, right?   

It's only a matter of time for the arrival of varroa here, both sides of politics have spent years weakening our quarantine process, to "save money" - I think the defining fault or Achilles heel of democracy seems to be that long term planning is a up until the next budget/election cycle (and short term planning is covering up what happened last week). Next thing, we will have rabies, just about everything else, from small hive beetle to Asian Bees, to papaya fly, has come in since the "reforms" of Quarantine started big time in the nineties.

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Lone
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2013, 10:55:28 AM »

Quote
When Varroa showed up in South Africa the beekeepers all agreed to do nothing.  They were out of the woods as far as Varroa issues within a couple of years.

I thought african bees are more aggressive than european bees? 

Probably we need to follow the experience of countries that have had varroa affecting european bees.

Lone

 
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Lone
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« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2013, 11:06:00 AM »

By the way, Wonga, I can't grow lavendar up here and coriander always goes to seed, but we do have a heap of neem trees around the hives.  I wonder if anyone has tried the miticidal properties of neem oil on varroa.  The bees might object, however.  http://www.livestrong.com/article/99452-neem-oil-uses/

Lone
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prestonpaul
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« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2013, 10:46:16 PM »

Hops are supposed to be good too, I believe there is a commercial varoa product using hop extract. I planted a row of hops behind my bees late last year (I am a sometimes home brewer). Be interesting to see how they go next season. They didn't do much this season as they need plenty of water and I don't have a water supply in my orchard yet.
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Wonga
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The budget should be balanced, the Treasury refill


« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2013, 12:55:47 AM »

Lone, neem maybe good, worth trying. I think its a whole different world up there in the tropics.

The hops sound good, Paul, I home brew but do it the easy way. Are hops a bulky type plant?
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prestonpaul
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« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2013, 04:15:10 AM »

Hops don't spread out as such, they are a climber and prefer to grow upwards. Commercially they grow them up strings tied to overhead wires, at home you can do similar or grow them up a post or trellice or similar. I had mine growing up 3m high strings, and that wasn't high enough, they were still looking for places to go when they got to the top!
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2013, 10:19:07 AM »

>Probably we need to follow the experience of countries that have had varroa affecting european bees.

Why?  They haven't had any luck getting a handle on it.

“If you’re not part of the genetic solution of breeding mite-tolerant bees, then you’re part of the problem”– Randy Oliver
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Lone
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« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2013, 12:25:01 PM »

Quote
Lone, neem maybe good, worth trying. I think its a whole different world up there in the tropics.


I did a spot of googling and there has been research into the use of neem oil on varroa e.g.  http://ebookbrowse.com/effects-of-neem-oil-on-varroa-mites-and-bees-pdf-d436275755

Maybe one day they will be able to separate the chemical that zaps mites from (hopefully) the different one that kills brood.  But I don't know if having neems or other plants near bees deters mites.

Quote
>Probably we need to follow the experience of countries that have had varroa affecting european bees.

Why?  They haven't had any luck getting a handle on it.

“If you’re not part of the genetic solution of breeding mite-tolerant bees, then you’re part of the problem”– Randy Oliver


Why? In order to learn from their mistakes - what NOT to do..!

Is there another answer to solving varroa troubles than having more aggressive bees?

Lone
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2013, 10:38:08 AM »

>Is there another answer to solving varroa troubles than having more aggressive bees?

I have no aggressive bees and no Varroa problem.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beessctheories.htm
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnaturalcell.htm
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoursimplesteps.htm
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
jayj200
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« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2014, 07:49:09 PM »

Bio Control for Varroa Mite on Vimeo
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jayj200
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« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2014, 08:49:57 AM »

Hops are supposed to be good too, I believe there is a commercial varoa product using hop extract. I planted a row of hops behind my bees late last year (I am a sometimes home brewer). Be interesting to see how they go next season. They didn't do much this season as they need plenty of water and I don't have a water supply in my orchard yet.

preston
do you have a flowing stream nearby?

seams there is a device that uses a little water presure frpm the stream. to pump water uphill.

look up wranglerstar/doityoueself
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drlonzo
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« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2014, 11:05:02 PM »

>Is there another answer to solving varroa troubles than having more aggressive bees?

I have no aggressive bees and no Varroa problem.


I must say after reading all that it makes my head swim a little bit, but on the upside of things, you've made a believer out of me.  I bought Russians due to sucky weather here, but also due to their genetics, and not having to treat them, you've opened my eyes to other things that could possibly be the reasons for their success.  

I have but one question for you -  what is your take on feeding the bees honey back to them, or even buying honey to ramp up production of combs?
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